Are Canadian and USA Crocheters Different from the Rest of the World?

Mikey, The Crochet Crowd

Mikey, The Crochet Crowd

I am Michael Sellick, known online as 'Mikey', I am the founder and leader of The Crochet Crowd. I'm a 'hooker' at heart with the passion to crochet and play with yarn.

88 thoughts on “Are Canadian and USA Crocheters Different from the Rest of the World?

  • June 27, 2014 at 6:40 pm
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    I use all types of yarn and thread depending on the project. I do like the thinner yarns better for clothing. I don’t use the very fine threads anymore because they hurt my hands but really admire the finished projects of those who do.

  • May 6, 2014 at 11:36 am
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    Hi Mikey, I’m from the UK. I change the yarn to suit whatever project I work on. For instance I used aran for the giraffes and dk for the lapghan. The more complicated the better for me as I like a challenge. I have crocheted adult sweaters before and also the more intricate fine cotton items. So basically I don’t mind what I am doing, how many projects I have on the go at any one time, or how long they take. Perhaps this is a UK thing!

  • April 12, 2014 at 9:30 pm
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    I make baby cloths and small things/ I don’t like working with yarn that makes my hands hurt from pulling it though the loops.

  • April 10, 2014 at 9:48 pm
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    I agree totally Mikey. We tend to take things for granted as we have ample supply of what we want. I could care less on the time of a project I am doing. I do like the thinner yarns as they make the work softer. As for intricate. I happen to think that is one of those things that you do when you are making something you know will be important to the person you are making it for. For example. I have a new grandson. Making the many baby afghans for him to snuggle in his first year, I spent a lot of time making patterns that were different. I also used thread to crochet a christening gown and sweater which took well over a month to get finished because I hope it will be handed down for a few generations.

    • April 11, 2014 at 4:31 pm
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      That’s lovely. I’m happy as long as I have a project to be getting on with. Also if something is worth doing, it’s worth doing properly, so time doesn’t come into it.

  • April 8, 2014 at 11:13 am
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    Of course there are differences among cultures as well as availability of yarns. Here in Chile we have a really huge variety of yarns, cottons, linens and so on. From sheep, alpaca, llama and among them, different types. Once a year a big showroom is held but the whole year we have a lot of stores to buy almost whatever we look for. There are some streets specially dedicated to it and they have a wide range of prices, going from pure wool to synthetic, rustic or very refined, national or imported.
    I am 56 and I have been knitting and crocheting since I was 4… a long time I have been an addicted… I recognize it. Last year I also gave classes to some friends and I am the “master” among them.
    The main difference is referred to the way in which the patterns for crochet are described. We are used to diagrams and that is why mos of the times I read/watch the instructions/video and sketch the diagram for my use. Now I know better the differences and your videos have been very valuable for me. You are so clear to explain and teach. Thanks for that. I wish I woul have more time to crochet but in 4 years I’ll be retired!!! and maybe I would collect the money to go in one of your cruises. In the meantime, I crochet at night when I get back from the job, besides the sea, in the physician waiting room, everywhere.
    Speed is important but in the sense I want to see the piece finished, because I have at least 4 pieces doing at the same time.
    As a summary, crocheting (and art/crafts in general) is like an universal language.
    I have many pictures of my pieces, but I am not sure how to share them with you. Do I have to label them with crochetcrowd in FB?
    Ana

  • April 6, 2014 at 7:08 pm
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    speed not a factor for me. Yarns love them all and like mixing them if I can, Mad Hatter was one I did just that πŸ™‚ Thru you I have learned I can do more then blankets and I’m trying all different kinds of projects some very complex some so easy I should have tried years ago lol! Loving my new found freedom in crocheting!!

  • April 6, 2014 at 9:25 am
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    I like thinner yarns. I am not speedy unless knitting a blanket. I like doilies. Years ago I crocheted fashion doll items for my niece for Christmas not knowing how “hard” it is to crochet. I just love the look of the thread crochet.

  • April 6, 2014 at 1:47 am
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    first time replying to one of these! speed only matters on the mood i’m in if i know right off that the pattern is going to take some time to do it and my mood is not going to handle it i will put it off until i know that i have enough patience to finish it and then contrarily i will start a pattern that i know will take some time to do if i know that i will have a lot off time with no interruptions i recently saw some yarns from around the world and noticed the differences in the yarn how wool was the largest part of the yarn not the blends that we have here

  • April 5, 2014 at 9:53 pm
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    Hi From the Land-Down-Under!!! I have great difficulty trying to work out the PLY of the yarn used in American Patterns – worked out the stitches years ago, so my brain recognizes American Crochet Speak and instantly converts, so no worries there!
    I love patterns that are different and unusual – I don’t mind how long they take as long as the time put in is worth the finished result. That being said, I do enjoy quick projects that you can whip up, throw over the shoulder and start the next one πŸ™‚
    I have worked in very fine crochet cotton (#100) right up to 12 ply wool. I spin my own wool, and have taught others to spin as well (although the four wardrobes of un-spun wool are a bit guilt making lol – at least the cupboards are well insulated!
    I am only relatively new to your Blog Mikey, but I have enjoyed being part of it all – Thanks xx
    Really looking forward to the “Mystery Crochet” project πŸ™‚
    CROCHET AROUND THE WORLD!!!

  • April 5, 2014 at 5:17 pm
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    Hi Michael !!! I am south american from far, far away……from Uruguay and there is not the beautiful yarns that there is in EE.UU. generally it comes from Brasil and Mexico. I like the proyects quick, but definitively I cannot to be quick than Michael!!!

  • April 5, 2014 at 12:51 pm
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    Well I’m in the US, but I like all kinds of crochet projects. I have both worster weight and thicker yarns as well as thin cotton threads. I’ve been making crochet earrings with the thread, but have been looking for other projects in thread. One of the trouble I have with the thread however is eyesight. Its harder to see the stitches than with thicker yarns. So I look for easier patterns in thread.

  • April 5, 2014 at 7:50 am
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    Speed is not a factor when I start a project..it is a relaxation thing for me! Using the thinner yarns, like for doily making,sure does allow a more intricate design and the results are to be proud of. You are right in saying that we don’t have so many choices here in the US for those lovely yarns they have in other countries. My friend is from SA and lived in the UK for many years and has a drawer full of gorgeous yarns I would love! Thanx for sharing! K

  • April 5, 2014 at 2:03 am
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    I am from South Africa. My answers are-
    1. Yes, speed is important, I get bored working on one project too long. I learned in art working on more than one project at the same time, keeps the creative juices flowing. When I loose interest in one project I go on to another, and then come back to the first one later. It works for me.
    2. No, but I do use yarns that are availeble and also affordable. I’ve tried to use double yarn strings in some projects, and I liked the results.
    3. I like variety, new patterns and different stitches. I crochet and knit, amigurumi, scarves, coasters, cardigans, and more. I still want to do an afgan though! πŸ™‚

  • April 5, 2014 at 12:14 am
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    As I get older I like the thicker yarns. I love the thinner yarns and the beautiful intricate patterns you can create with them. However, at 65 my eyesight is not as good as it once was so I pass on those yarns and projects. I get so many requests now for afghans, scarves, hats, baby items, that quick is always good. I think I have “to do” WIP to fill up the next 5 years but still keep finding new things to do – and once in a while something for me, too. You have rekindled my creative side with your recent challenges and am starting to create some of my own patterns. Thank you for that and for making me realize there is no age limit on creativity. Just because I can’t do the intricate projects now, there are so many yarns and colors out there. There is no limit or boundaries on creativity! I need a new T-Shirt that says “so many yarns….not enough time”

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:41 pm
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    I like worsted weight yarn to work with because of the testure yyou can get from it, not flat like knitting.I like quick projects. Especially easy things like hats so I can multi-task while crocheting,I work at home and I do most of it while talking on the phone using the computer and interviewing people, or canvassing. I’ve noticed on some website that are Uk or European that they talk about wpi(wraps per inch) for yarn thickness instead of 4 ply and 8 ply because here in Canada you can get a worsted weight yarn like Red Heart comfort classed as a #4 and Red Heart soft or Bernat satin also classed as a #4 but they are more like a sport weight,compared to the Red Heart Comfort. I have no patience for fine yarns like baby layettes,My grandmother made lace by hand and did tatting which I knew at 8 yrs of age I would never,ever have the desire to do or learn . My knitting is very slow, dishcloth and scarves. Not coordinated enough to knit, I hold the one needle braced under my left armpit

  • April 4, 2014 at 8:47 pm
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    I love patterns wheather quick, easy, hard, i like all grains of yarn but it has to be right to the pattern instructions.

  • April 4, 2014 at 8:19 pm
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    I love the intricate lacey projects but if I have a rough day I like the bulky fast projects to Zen out.

  • April 4, 2014 at 7:03 pm
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    I love quick and easy projects, but there are times when I want more complicated projects, but I want a challenge. I get bored if the projects are too easy. However, I have been crocheting for several years. I do find knitting to be challenging in that I am a slow knitter, and it takes me forever to complete a small project. I tend to lose interest, frog it, and start a crochet project instead. LOL!

  • April 4, 2014 at 6:32 pm
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    As an American who moved to New Zealand some years ago, I do miss the abundance of thicker, more varied coloured and less expensive yarns that I had access to stateside. And the cost of shipping to the ‘bottom of the world’ is a major factor, especially when you have to take it into consideration when figuring out whether you’re over the allowed amount for no duty tax.

    That said, if a project isn’t “interesting” (doesn’t have to be intricate, necessarily), I get bored if it takes too long…I like projects that allow me to ‘zen out’, and short motifs/small projects just don’t have that.

    Being “around” other crocheters, albeit mostly only via the internet has made me stretch my skills and ability, and has challenged me to attempt projects I would never have considered previously, altho’ I do admit to craving working on an afghan/blanket/throw when I’ve done a lot of other types of projects.

  • April 4, 2014 at 6:11 pm
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    I am in Australia, and crochet with hooks from .5mm to 12mm using everything from crochet cotton thread to 12ply. It all depends upon the project I have chosen to do. I design my own patterns as well as use advertised patterns.I have no problems with obtaining bulky yarns, or any yarn for that matter.

    When I need wool I venture to woollen mills or purchase from local speciality wool shops as I prefer to use pure wool. My friend and I take a shopping lost to purchase all of our wool at once, we have been known to stay in the mills for hours selecting our yarns for various projects. We go at least twice a year. I have been known to order rowan yarns from England for something different, but on the whole prefer Australian yarns. I tend to purchase my crochet threads from a craft shop.

    • April 4, 2014 at 6:45 pm
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      As for WIP, several…
      -an 8ply blanket on the go (using a bulky stitch to make a thick project).
      -lace using a .75mm hook and crochet thread, just finished designing the pattern.
      -12ply Tunisian crochet wrap
      – 8ply Tunisian crochet jumper
      -lace using .5mm book and crochet thread, can’t decide on edging so will sit on it for a while

      It gets a little hot here to crochet over summer, so all these projects are now back on the boil, and should be finished within the next 3months.

      I find 12ply blankets, unless completed using an open stitch, tend to be a little too warm. I mainly use bulky yarns for wraps or vests or shrugs

      As.for speed, I crocheted a top in2ply in 3days as I wanted to wear it for Christmas day. It does depend upon the project and the level of concentration required as I have small children and prefer to do crochet projects that I do not have to ‘think’ about when they are awake and leave the finer or more detailed projects for when they are asleep. Hence, I have varying WIP.

      • April 4, 2014 at 10:34 pm
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        I like to vary my project as both in how detailed the pattern is as well as the yarn used. When I work on a lengthy project I also do some quicker projects at the same time which keeps me from getting bored

  • April 4, 2014 at 5:57 pm
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    I agree with Donna C
    oombes, here in Australia we have little need of the thicker yarns, 8 ply is really thick enough, even 5 ply, I have recently crotchet a novelty blankie for my grand-daughter in 8 ply, it is so heavy, but some times it would be nice to finish an afghan as
    quickly as Mikey does.

  • April 4, 2014 at 5:05 pm
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    Mikey, I think you are right about availability of yarns. Here in Australia it is difficult to get the thicker wool in a variety of colors so we use the thinner ply yarn for our projects. Also our climate is no where near as cold as yours which is probably why would explain the problem with getting heavier ply yarns.

    • April 4, 2014 at 6:14 pm
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      Where are you in oz? I am able to purchase bulky wool quite easily….

  • April 4, 2014 at 4:53 pm
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    Speed is not necessarily important as I usually give myself plenty of time to finish a project. Thickness of yarn would depend on who the project is for, or in some cases what the project is, for example if I was doing a tablecloth it would be made of the crochet cotton size 10 or maybe baby yarn. I also like a challenging pattern. Right now I am looking for a tablecloth for my dining room table ( about 60″ or so round), if anyone has a pattern that they would like to share.

  • April 4, 2014 at 4:38 pm
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    The more intricate a pattern is the more I like it. The more difficult the pattern the more I am able to perfect my skills. I take pride in my work and find personal satisfaction in a finished piece that took skill not idiot stitching without thought. That is for beginners. After more than 50+ years I consider myself an advanced intermediate (if there is such a thing). {just my opinion folks}

  • April 4, 2014 at 4:11 pm
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    Crochet threads are not my favorite mostly because of the size hook needed. It’s hard for me to see that itty bitty hook and my hands tend to cramp up when using steel hooks. that said, I don’t like bulky or super chunky either…guess I’m a middle road on yarn size. I’ve never used sock yarn but I love sport/baby weight and worsted. I can get just about anything done that I’m interested in doing in those weights. I’m also a multiple project kind of person. Right now I’m working on an entrelac afghan for my daughter and making 2 of the mystery adventure items and I will be starting a baby blanket for a family member soon.

  • April 4, 2014 at 4:10 pm
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    I never like to rush through a project. The reason I crochet and knit is for relaxation so I never stress to get a project completed. Since I do like intricate designs, working with thinner yarn is right up my alley.

  • April 4, 2014 at 4:08 pm
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    Speed is important to me, I like Amigurumi because most things can be completed In a day or two whereas I’ve been working on the star pattern afghan for my granddaughter since Christmas *sigh*
    I DETEST thin yarn!! I find it SO hard to work with and see!!
    I don’t mind an elaborate project IF the directions are CLEAR and easy to understand! I get SUPER frustrated at some of these patterns that make it WAY more difficult than it needs to be.
    I have tried quite a few new things since joining “The Crowd” and have truly enjoyed learning new stitched and techniques and the CAL’s! I LOVE seeing everyone’s beautiful projects and get loads of inspiration from all of you!

  • April 4, 2014 at 3:44 pm
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    I like to do the doilies. But usually have an afghans going at the same time so that if I get tired of one project I can switch to the other. Also the afghans I like to do have a simple stitch and one color so I can take it with me on road trips or dr. visits as something to do rather than just sit and stare. I love the new projects that the crochet crowd comes out with like the heart mug. Learned new technic’s there. I am lucky that I can switch between the thin and the bulkier yarns but do prefer the lighter weight yarns. Red Heart sport yarns and some of the lion brand yarns work best for me. As well as the tabletop threads.

  • April 4, 2014 at 3:42 pm
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    I would have to agree, Mikey. If the pattern isn’t interesting, or short term, I will put it down and most likely never pick it up again. I can’t tell you how many wip’s I have in my closet that will likely never be finished.
    I am not too keen on thinner yarns. They’re just too delicate to me. And you’re right, the thicker yarns work up faster. I truly admire the intricate work I have seen from other countries, but I know I wouldn’t have the patience for it.

  • April 4, 2014 at 2:48 pm
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    Since I crochet in miniature using one strand of embroidery floss, speed is not of the utmost importance to me. I do find it difficult to find finer yarns locally especially those that aren’t too expensive.

    • April 4, 2014 at 4:43 pm
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      In an emergency sewing thread works well. Easy to use as many strands as needed. Lots of color choices too. Sometimes I only need a short piece to make say a ‘mouth’ and it is just easier to use my sewing thread than to have to order a whole skein then wait a week for it to be delivered. Give it a try Marilyn.

  • April 4, 2014 at 2:41 pm
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    When I was young, I had very good eye sight. I enjoyed the intricacies of doilies and other fine and delicate crocheting/knitted patters. I even made a wedding dress with a hooded jacket as requested by my mother-in-law that was worn by two brides. My eyes developed age-related problems so it is difficult to tackle those fine, intricate patterns now. I have several projects in progress. One is usually more time consuming than others. When I get bored or I am having problems with the project, I take a break from it to work on other less time-consuming projects. I wanted to make a Mad Hatter Hat of the Queen of Hearts, but could not because I needed a finer yarn which would give me more stitches per inch to develop the skirt design –I was afraid it would not stand up. I still would like to try it though and might do it yet.

  • April 4, 2014 at 2:25 pm
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    Thinner yarns and intricate stitch patterns interest me (size 10 thread…) I tend to like the more old-fashioned projects. Of course, I do want to finish projects during my lifetime, so speed, or perhaps proficiency, is important as well.

  • April 4, 2014 at 2:10 pm
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    I’m having technical problems today. I’ve tried to reply to this more than once, but ended up erasing my reply. Once, it was a really long reply. I’ll try to shorten this one.

    First of all, I think you’re right about yarn availability having a lot to do with the way we crochet. I’m in the US, and, even where I live, in WV, there are yarns that aren’t readily available in the stores, but I know that I can get just about anything I want by ordering it online and I’ll have it usually within a week.

    But, I’ve had more time crocheting than many of your subscribers. I was first taught crochet by an aunt in 1957. She was really good at intricate crochet. She did things like lace doilies, and she dressed dolls with some very intricate lacy dresses and the big full length skirts. But when she taught me, she had some very specific rules. Rules that weren’t designed to make it much fun for a child. So, needless to say, I didn’t do much.

    Today we not only have more variety and availability of yarns than ever before, there’s the internet that can be used as a teaching tool. When I was first crocheting, it was extremely hard to learn something. Now I can look up almost any stitch and find out how to do it. It’s very likely that I can find a video teaching it if I can’t understand written directions.I’m sure this influences the way we crochet too.

    When I think about the way my aunt, and people of her generation crocheted, I realize they really didn’t want or feel like they needed the variety of yarns we have today. Companies are only providing those yarns because they realize we will buy them. Perhaps if enough people in other countries want those yarns there is a way they could let companies know they want them (or if it is an American Company-let them know that they’re likely to make a profit by locating in a particular area).

  • April 4, 2014 at 2:07 pm
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    US and Cannda being cold countries, the yarn available is bulky.So whatever is made is warmer. In tropical countries where the winter temp never dips below 20 degree Celsius, then making things with thick yarn is pointless. But since there are people who love to crochet and knit everywhere, then the yarn available is to suit the climate of that country.
    Having said all this , I am still dying to use some nice thick bulky yarn which I dont get here ( India)

  • April 4, 2014 at 1:38 pm
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    I love to crochet, knit and if truth be known, any and all handcrafts. I love the bulky yarns, but I also like the sport and finer yarns as well. I find though, that our handy Walmart only carries the bulky yarns and none of the sport or finer yarns. If I want them, I need to order online. I am game to try any project and I have several in progress. There is never a time when I am so bored that I don’t have anything to do. Love my yarn!

  • April 4, 2014 at 12:58 pm
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    Speed is important to me also, but not in the way you might think. The time I made 3 sweaters in 2 weeks made me step back and re-evaluate. I took up knitting at that time, so I could slow down. Now I alternate between crocheting and knitting.

  • April 4, 2014 at 12:41 pm
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    Speed is very important to me. I am not your normal hooker- it takes me longer than others to crochet a single project due to my health. So what one person can whip out in a day, takes me two to three weeks, if I am lucky. I have learned to have a lot of patience, something I did not always have. I have learned to work on several projects at a time- one big one, and then small ones so I can get that feeling of accomplishment. My big project is growing slowly, but I am still accomplishing smaller projects in the meantime. It works for me.

    • April 7, 2014 at 7:12 am
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      You echo what I do exactly. I am working on a large afghan but I do get bored with it. I work on smaller things to give me a feeling of accomplishment.

  • April 4, 2014 at 12:29 pm
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    Here in Jamaica, most crocheters use mercerised cotton crochet thread (very thin) as opposed to thick yarns. Even though thicker yarns and a variety of colours are available here, they are not as plentiful as in North America. We mostly have Redheart yarn. When I started learning crochet around two years ago I learned to use thicker yarn (worsted weight medium) but I also use the thinner cotton yarn also which takes so much more time. The time I spend on a project depends on weather I’m on a deadline or just doing it for leisure but generally I prefer quick, small projects that I can finish fast and move on to the next one. I also do many projects at a time (I’ve been working on a bed spread for months but I’ve done many small projects like scarves and hats in-between). I find I sometimes don’t have the patience for elaborate projects, lol.

  • April 4, 2014 at 12:17 pm
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    I was blessed and lucky enough to be able to go to New Zealand for five weeks for work. I had two days off together once and rented a car. I did, quite incidently, find a yarn store, and what a place it was/is! They would process the wool straight from shearing thru spun yarn. When I was there in1991, all they had was natural colours in 2 ply, very fine to 12 ply, which, as I remember was quite the chunky yarn.
    I don’t know, tho, if the rest of the commonwealth has the wide selection of plys in their yarn.

  • April 4, 2014 at 12:00 pm
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    I meet on FB messenger with my friend of 13 years in Liverpool, England every Tuesday and Saturday evenings…WE ALWAYS discuss CROCHET, YARN, HOOKS, ect…..She tells me she has trouble finding affordable yarn there…and the VARIETY of colors and bulk of yarn is so different. I have mailed her lots of yarn over the years and also some hooks….when I sent her a couple of the “light up” hooks in a size G and H….she was shocked at the size…..not to mention how shocked she was to see the even larger hooks in J, K, M, ect…lol….but I do enjoy doing faster projects too Mikey because I get bored easily as well…..although…I work afghans with another project going at the same time so I can switch up to keep from getting bored….What can I say…I just love crochet…..

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:52 am
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    I have also noticed that outside the US projects are very much more detailed and intricate than we do here. I love working with thread and have done many projects over the years with it, but it is a time consuming task and you really do need to be patient to be able to work with the fine thread and teeny tiny hooks. I also love working on larger projects like afghans. I think it is because we are such an instant gratification society here and we want things done now! I tend to switch between different projects depending on my mood. If I’ve been working a detailed or thread project I’ll probably set it aside for something with a bulkier yarn and do something for that instant gratification I need and then go back to my thread project. Personally I don’t like doing amigurumi, it kills my fingers. I’m in awe of some of the Irish lace and complex designs I see coming from Russia especially.

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:49 am
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    It depends on how important the project is to me. I crochet about 40% of the time, knit 20%, and do counted cross stitch 20%, as well as being a full time working mother. I usually have one boring project to have handy to do in front of the TV. If it’s an important gift or something very beautiful to me, like the red work cross stitch Noel heart I am currently working on, I will eventually finish it, but like one of the previous comments, I keep a few smaller projects going to keep it fun. Your favorite hobby should not feel like work. Normally, if it takes an hour to make an inch the time just isn’t worth it – you won’t see me working with size 20 thread or 18 count Aida cloth.

    • April 4, 2014 at 12:13 pm
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      I just realized that I can’t seem to add today! I meant to say 30%, not 20%.

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:45 am
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    Speed is important to me – I don’t like projects to drag on and on…I typically have 2-3 small projects and can be finished in an afternoon and 1 that I do slowly (currently my daughter’s neon colored star afghan). I don’t own many thin yarns. I love seeing everyone’s complicated designs but if I stare to long I get headaches:-)

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:44 am
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    I think speed depends on what I am doing. If it is a blanket…then yes. Fast and quick or I’m board. However, most of the time I have lots of WIP going on at the same time so if i get board with 1 i change to another one! . I am from Pacific Beach, WA. and I do a lot of stuffed toys for kids. I have in the past used the thinner yarns and threads for doilies and such.. I am now experimenting with bulky yarns, and think the thinner yarns are easier to work with, lol so yes, speed is a definite factor…

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:41 am
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    For me, the thickness of the yarn is important based on what I am making. If I want something to last a long time under heavy/hard use (like kids’ blankets or dishcloths/scrubbies I go for cotton in a #4 worsted weight. If it is something that has to last more than one fashion season, but won’t get quite as much physical use, I can use just about any yarn I want to for the effect I want in the piece.

    The other thing I noticed, since you mentioned it, the tension on pieces made in Europe are much tighter…which I logically conclude to be due to the cost of yarn and the lack of availability. Case in point: A friend of mine came to USA from Australia to visit for a few months. She was all excited to see an “American City”. She got outside the airport and her first comment about her surroundings was “Hm. Looks a lot like Sydney.” Well, so much for first impressions, eh?

    However, the differences became very apparent as we passed our first gas station. She went bonkers at the price ($3.20/gal) and the very fact that gas was sold by the gallon. In Australia, gas (they say ‘petrol’) is sold for almost that much by the liter!

    We stopped at a WalMart Supercenter to get a few things to make lunch with…and she found the craft section….wow. She stood and stared at the 20 feet of yarn display on the back wall of the section of the store…. It took her almost three minutes to take it all in and process that all that yarn was right in front of her. Forty-five minutes later she finally picked out one of every color of Red Heart Super Saver that was there on display. But I wasn’t finished wow-ing her yet…..

    After lunch, I had her write down the colors she had already purchased. Color number and name. She wrote the list twice because she was going to send a note back home to tell her mother what she found within the first 2 hours of landing in the USA.

    Then I took her to a JoAnn’s Craft Store the next day. She was so overjoyed to see so much in one place I thought she was going to pass out! Good thing I had the whole day open because it took her all morning to go through and just LOOK at what was there….and after lunch we went to Hobby Lobby and pretty much spent the afternoon there.

    When we got home to my house, I asked her what she was most impressed with on her second day in USA. She said the craft section of our WalMart was bigger than most craft stores in her area in Australia! She wanted to buy everything Worsted Weight and above, but she could only ‘post’ so much to herself from USA and not pay any duties or importation fees. I made sure she got to send herself some nice boxes before she returned home to enjoy them all, and share with her friends and ‘Mum”.

    • April 4, 2014 at 11:49 am
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      Unless I need something for a last minute gift, speed isn’t important to me. I often crochet with crochet threads, tatting thread or sewing thread.

    • April 4, 2014 at 2:17 pm
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      Wow! What a wonderful experience! I guess we just don’t know how lucky we are. I had to smile while reading your note, though, because I had the thought that I can spend a whole afternoon in Hobby Lobby, and I’ve lived here all my life. Seriously, though, your comment is eye opening to me!

    • April 7, 2014 at 7:05 am
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      I guess I would have the same re-action as your friend. Oh yes, I do have a Walmart but it isn’t anything like yours. I am housebound now so getting out to a wool shop is just a dream. I have a lot of yarn but not enough of one colour to do anything. I do have loads of yarn to knit socks and lace yarn but I don’t want to make shawls anymore.
      I hope she has a wonderful time while visiting. Dorothy

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:37 am
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    I like to do intricate/ lace/hairpin clothes but also like to see quick results! Hence, I always have an intricate and a fast project or projects on the go at the same time-solves the boredom aspect. in terms of thickness of yarn between Canada/USA and here in England, I just go with the thickness I think is suitable for the project and adjust hook size, numbers of stitches etc to suit the size I require.

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:33 am
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    I like it all! I started with table cloths, intricate stitch afghans, then simpler items, haven’t gotten into clothing yet but it’s on the bucket list. Switch it up to keep it interesting!

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:32 am
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    Speed is important in some projects, but if I see something I just have to make, I am willing to put more time in. I actually have a tote bag that I keep current projects in — things that I am going to finish, but just weren’t going fast enough at the time. I also keep a cone of my favorite cotton yarn in there for those times I just need to finish something really quickly to feel like I am getting things done. I grab that, make a quick dish scrubby and go back to a larger project in the bag. : )

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:25 am
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    I enjoy a challenge. The pattern must first offer that. Speed isn’t essential, as long as it holds my interest. Weight of yarn does not matter, though, I do love all the new types/weights that are offered nowadays compared to when I was much younger. My favorite still is crocheting w/ thread using my vintage patterns from my large collection.

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:23 am
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    I stick with worsted weight and sport/dk yarn. Anything too thick like bulky makes my hands tired and painful. Same with the thinner yarns. I’d love to be able to crochet some lace, but my eyesight says, “no way.” Repetitive patterns which are usually good for speeding along, bore me to tears. I’m doing a c2c right at the moment and I find I keep having to push myself to work on it. I like a pattern that you have to pay attention to.

    • April 7, 2014 at 6:50 am
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      Hi Debi, I know exactly what you are talking about. I am making my son a rectangular granny afghan. I have made a lot of afghans before and it didn’t bother me. Now at age 80 my arms get so tired and my hands go numb. I also can’t see fine work. I still knit a lot, mainly socks for a programme that is run in my area. I’m finding that I enjoy booties and want to crochet baby things. I’m just working on Crocodile Booties which have been challenging and fun. I hope you find something that you enjoy doing.

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:20 am
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    I like projects that are relatively speedy so I can see the results quickly. I like thinner a yarns but certainly work with the thickets ones as well. I love Lions Brands Vannas Colors best. As for difficulty, I have been crocheting since I was a child – 30+ years – just not consistently so I prefer easier projects. I am working a crochet along right now that is easy but has several new stitches to learn so that is fun.

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:18 am
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    Speed is not necessarily a factor for me (though I wish my current baby afghan project, a 4-color ripple, would work up just a wee bit faster). I’d rather take the time and do a great job than just whip off item after item. However, sometimes I do love a quick and easy project–I did 50+ 4-leaf clover pins for my kids’ classmates and teachers last month; I chose the pattern I did because it was just one round and worked up quickly (I only thought about making them a little over a week before St. Patrick’s Day, so didn’t have the time or money to do something more elaborate). I actually ended up being about 2-3 pins short the day that I was going to send the pins in with the kids, so I made three more, glued the safety pins to the backs of the new ones, AND drove over to the school to drop the pins off in less than an hour. Now I’m working on Easter bunny hats for my kids (I have two) plus a couple nieces. 4 hat bases, 8 ears, and probably 3 embellishments takes a good bit of time!

    Thinner yarns do fascinate me. Most of my work thus far has been with worsted-weight yarns (i.e., Red Heart Super Saver or Caron Simply Soft), but I’ve worked a little bit with size 5 and size 10 crochet threads. I would love to be able to get my hands on some thinner yarns (fingering, sport, etc), but that’s going to have to wait until I can actually afford them!

    How elaborate my projects are depends on the kind of mood I’m in or who I’m making the project in question for. My first afghan was made for my husband–it ended up being a giant granny square that’s about 68 inches square (3 inches bigger than I am tall) and has a simple double V edging around it (I didn’t want anything that looked remotely girly. I ended up using 6 different yarns–2 Caron “One Pound” yarns, and 4 RHSS yarns–by the time I finished the project. The shamrocks were made from one of two different green yarns (one was definitely RHSS, and I’m not sure about the other, though it could have been RHSS as well). The bunny hats I’m working on are still kinda up in the air–I needed to crochet a flower to cover up a repair job that I had to do (which was faster to do than just frogging the project to the point where the repair job was done), and of course they’re all getting ears, but I haven’t decided whether they should also get facial features. We shall see!

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:17 am
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    I usually knit, so using fine to worsted as my main choices. Knitting is definitely a slower pace than crocheting for me. I don’t think the reason I find that I love Worsted (10 ply) better is for speed, as much as price and comfort. Also I can see what I am what doing easier than with fancy or thinner yarns… plus it doesn’t split as much. Also on the point of intricate, I am just picking up the crochet hook again after a few years, to relieve my joint stress of knitting; I use the alternate hand. And well, I am not that good at it yet! If I want a lacy or intricate project I think I would go back to knit as that is where I am most comfortable in my skills.
    I do agree that many from Europe and Asia have some of the best skills I just love pouring over all the photos of finished projects and wishing I could read what is going on!

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:13 am
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    I usually have several projects going at once a larger afghan type project that will go fast, another afghan with more details that will take time and a smaller more intricate project like a doily. That way I can do what my mood dictates, if I’m patient or the dogs are calm then I can work on the detailed one, if its the hustle and bustle of the day I can work on a fast easy project. I love experimenting with yarns but my budget usually doesn’t allow handmade designer yarns so I love that the mainstream companies such as Red Heart and Lion brand are expanding into designer type yarns that I can afford.

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:10 am
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    I used to want to get a project done in a hurry. Now, I enjoy taking my time because it is more relaxing. It seems everything else in life has to be done in a hurry so taking my time with my knitting and crochet are more enjoyable. I usually work with medium worsted weight, but I do like sport yarn for baby projects and sock yarn for making socks.

  • April 4, 2014 at 11:06 am
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    I keep multiple projects going because I get bored. I can’t just stick to one project until it’s done. I guess you could say I’m an ADD crocheter! LOL If I’m working on a large project such as an afghan I’ll also do several small projects as well. Right now I’m working on a CAL with Red Heart, making a lapghan for a friend’s husband, a blanket for my son, the mystery adventure, and scarves and hats as requested. πŸ™‚

    • April 4, 2014 at 11:20 am
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      As my husband and I say about our daughter (who tends to be easily distracted)…”Oh look, a butterfly!” πŸ˜€

    • April 4, 2014 at 9:44 pm
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      Holly you just described me to a T!!! I have an afghan, shopping bag, giant granny square blanket, dish cloths to order, and a special request cook top cover, all going at the same time. Never knew how to describe just why I have so many things going on at once, but guess ADD describes me !

  • April 4, 2014 at 10:59 am
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    I love it all, but do tend to get bored with slow projects, such as this entralac afghan. LOL

  • April 4, 2014 at 10:58 am
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    I don’t mind what ply of yarn (wool in the uk) or how long it takes. Not keen on crochet thread though. I love to crochet shawls and blankets for babies.

  • April 4, 2014 at 10:56 am
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    I am trending toward thicker yarns at the moment. I like projects to go quickly and find that most thinner yarns are beyond my experience right now.

  • April 4, 2014 at 10:54 am
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    I love seeing the completed work but the challenge of starting a new project and trying to figure out how to do a difficult pattern is maybe more fun for me.

  • April 4, 2014 at 10:54 am
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    I find in the UK there is less choice in finer yarns and have (until recently) mostly worked with DK and chunky. I have now started experimenting with filet and have grand plans as soon as I can find the quantities and colours of thread I need

    • April 4, 2014 at 1:10 pm
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      I am in the UK. The yarns sold near me are usually of the type used in the finer projects. I like the more bulky wools as I mainly crochet throws, plus the thicker the wool the faster the throw grows. We have very limited colours and I am sometimes quite envious when I see what other countries offer.

    • April 4, 2014 at 5:54 pm
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      You need to discover rowan yarns, they are English and I have them shipped to Australia, lovely yarn, excellent quality and a variety ply (2-12).

  • April 4, 2014 at 10:54 am
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    As far as speed goes, I am not a very fast crocheter in comparison to others I have watched. I just keep up a steady pace. Thinner yarn and more intricate patterns do not interest me. I don’t really get bored with simple patterns but would be frustrated if I had to crochet line by line reading the pattern. But I really admire those that do all the fancy stuff.

  • April 4, 2014 at 10:53 am
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    I don’t like using thinner yarns like crochet thread. I dont have the patience for intricacy anymore. My favorite yarns are RH with love, because its soft, and RH super saver because its durable; great for amigurumi. I do get bored the longer the project takes, but thats why I usually two or more projects going at once.

  • April 4, 2014 at 10:53 am
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    I have to agree with you I know I could probably do more intricate work but would try to hurry and screw it up. I like projects I can finish quickly, but still have every day uses.

  • April 4, 2014 at 10:52 am
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    Even though I do crochet very quickly, speed is not a factor for me when I choose a project. I do work with all thicknesses of yarns that are available to me. I have a bad habit of seeing something and trying to use a thinner yarn and smaller hook to make it ‘mini’ sized! I usually like moderately intricate patterns. I usually go for the very intricate patterns when I am knitting.

  • April 4, 2014 at 10:50 am
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    i can go either way. Speed is important when i need to whip up a quick gift, BUT, i can also totally appreciate a finer yarn and a complicated project–which includes the triumph that i feel upon completion of that project; this applies to knitting as well as crochet.

  • April 4, 2014 at 10:50 am
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    It all depends on the project but right now I’m drawn to the less bulky yarn. I love baby sport yarn and wish I could do more intricate work, I just get so confused sometimes when reading patterns lol

  • April 4, 2014 at 10:47 am
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    I love to see a project finished, BUT I sometimes feel that I have to change the way I am doing it because the yarn is to thick. When I go into a store, I don’t even look at the bulkier yarns. The only time I have ever even wanted a bulky yarn was when I use to do macrame. There are times when I feel that even solid colors of Red Heart feel to thick.

  • April 4, 2014 at 10:47 am
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    I have never really tried anything with a thinner yarn…I think that I, too, am afraid of getting bored. But my grandmother made beautiful crocheted doilies and even tablecloths, and I’d love to try that someday.
    I think that yarnwork is looked at differently in other countries. I lived in Germany for four years and noticed the popularity of knitting there. People took their projects everywhere…if you were on a train it was likely that from wherever you sat you could spot at least one person knitting a pair of socks. Smaller yarns sure would be easier to take along in your purse, and I think they valued putting time and effort into something beautiful and something that would have lasted 10 times as long as any socks you bought in a store!

    • April 4, 2014 at 3:10 pm
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      I too thought I would be bored working with thinner yarn. I discovered filet lace crochet using crochet thread. Using the filet method of crocheting makes the work go quicker. I did a tablecloth for my dining room table. It took my three months, but I was also working on other smaller projects to alleviate occasional boredom. Might be worth trying πŸ™‚

      • April 5, 2014 at 11:26 am
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        Made a pineapple tablecloth from a 1940’s pattern that was 120″ long by 90″ wide. It took me 6 months. And just a few short months later I sold it. Now I could kick myself for doing that. Thinking about making a replacement. Have 2 others started. When I finish them I definitely will do the pineapple. Love the pineapple design. I know you will love your tablecloth. Please don’t ever sell it. Any handmade tablecloth that took 3 mo. to make simply has to be beautiful and will be gorgeous on table set for special occasions.

  • April 4, 2014 at 10:46 am
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    I think speed depends on what I am doing. If it is a blanket…then yes. Fast and quick or I’m board. However, most of the time I am the opposite. I am from Seattle and I do a lot of amigurumi. I have a very hard time finding double knit yarn without having to go to specialty yarn shops. The major chains usually only cary worsted weight or bulky.

    • April 4, 2014 at 11:57 am
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      Hi Mikey,

      I’m guilty of having many projects on the go at once, so as not to get bored of a particular pattern.

      Unfortunately I’m from the UK, I say that with regards to access to yarn. I am also guilty of making many visits to the yarn shop, or any shop that sells yarn. I could browse on the Internet all day looking at yarns, it is a guilty pleasure of mine!!!

      So to answer your question, it is a mood kind of thing!!! Sometimes I want a quick project that I can work in a couple of hours, I fit them in around my more time consuming ones that tend to be more intricate patterns.

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