Cotton Yarn Experiment with Lily Sugar'n Cream

Does Cotton Matter in the Kitchen: The Experiment

Mikey, The Crochet Crowd

Mikey, The Crochet Crowd

I am Michael Sellick, known online as 'Mikey', I am the founder and leader of The Crochet Crowd. I'm a 'hooker' at heart with the passion to crochet and play with yarn.

19 thoughts on “Does Cotton Matter in the Kitchen: The Experiment

  • April 28, 2016 at 8:09 pm
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    I love my cotton yarn (Lily Sugar ‘n Cream) for my potholders. I use a “single crochet thermal stitch” so it is basically doubly thick. That way, it is as thick as any potholder, and being cotton, doesn’t conduct heat. I don’t have to worry about burning my fingers as there are no open spaces when I use this stitch. I’ve made about a dozen in multiple colors and use them ALL the time! What I learned is you want a heavier weight yarn (at least worsted weight) and a smaller hook, so your stitches will be tighter and have even less space, but will give you the firmness needed for a potholder. They keep getting used for hot things (and disappearing!), so I just keep making more of them!

  • April 22, 2016 at 1:12 pm
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    How can I* get a hard copy of the American Flag from Ravelry. I have signed on to Ravelry, but can not get a hard copy of the patriotic flag. Thank Sybwood73@aol.

    • Mikey, The Crochet Crowd
      April 23, 2016 at 9:02 am
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      You will have to contact the designer through Ravelry if you want it. I don’t have anything to do with Ravelry or a connection to make that happen. 🙂 There is a way to contact the individuals through Ravelry.

  • April 16, 2016 at 7:48 am
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    Bang on??

  • April 16, 2016 at 5:09 am
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    Bang on! Excellent article! Thanks. I’m just starting to experiment with cottons after years of using acrylics (allergic to animal hair) and this was a timely article for me. Looking forward to making some washcloths etc.

  • April 16, 2016 at 1:11 am
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    Love the article. Really puts it into perspective and answers why I never liked the hot pads my friend use to crochet for me. Guess I will have to share your info and guide her to the right product. Thank you for all you do.

  • April 15, 2016 at 10:25 pm
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    I use a lot of cotton as I usually do lots of small projects. I especially like making double thick potholders. Much better than anything I can buy. I also prefer crocheted washcloths although I find the normal “kitchen/craft” cotton too rough for skin. I usually buy a much softer premium cotton for those. Love your blog btw.

  • April 15, 2016 at 10:06 pm
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    Bang on, Mickey. Before I joined CC I used to knit. I have knit over 100 dishcloths and pot holders. I love a small project and now I crochet them. Very smart of you to mention about acrylic as most people don’t know the properties of cotton versus acrylic. Thanks for the info.

  • April 15, 2016 at 6:21 pm
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    Great article! When I make dish clothes and pot holders I do Tunisian simple stitch. Everyone lives them and they don’t shrink.

  • April 15, 2016 at 2:32 pm
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    Great tips, Mikey! The last line of your article reads “While acrylic yarns are fabulous in other parts of lives, the kitchen is the place for the acrylic.” Shouldn’t it read “While acrylic yarns are fabulous in other parts of lives, the kitchen ISN’T the place for the acrylic.

  • April 15, 2016 at 2:29 pm
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    Does any company make microfibre yarn then we could hand crochet microfibre cloths as they are very absorbent.??

  • April 15, 2016 at 2:25 pm
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    Great article, especially for new crocheters. I have just got my granddaughter interested in crochet, & she would benefit from this article. Thanks Mikey! You’re the best
    and so are the others at The Crochet Crowd!!

  • April 15, 2016 at 2:14 pm
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    Great article. One thing I would like to add is: If you wish to keep your cotton article absorbent, DO NOT use fabric softener when washing it. Fabric softeners will coat the fabric and make it water repellent. Years ago I had a washable raincoat with instructions to use fabric softener in the rinse water to help the coat retain it’s water resistance.

  • April 15, 2016 at 2:02 pm
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    ‘While acrylic yarns are fabulous in other parts of lives, the kitchen is the place for the acrylic.’ ….think there is a mistake in the final sentence.

  • April 15, 2016 at 1:49 pm
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    Love your cotton update…….but shouldn’t the last line read ” the kitchen is NOT the place for acrylic.” ?

  • April 15, 2016 at 1:34 pm
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    I’ve used Premier Home Cotton and it is just as good as other brands. And it’s a little less expensive for people on a fixed income (as I am). Right now it’s on sale in AC Moore for 10 skeins for $10.00. Thanks Happy Hooking!

  • April 15, 2016 at 1:13 pm
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    This is a fabulous article. Thank you for going through the steps of cotton vs. acrylic. I have made cotton dishcloths and personally love them. They withstand so much more than the store bought kind and you can have the exact look you want!

  • April 15, 2016 at 1:00 pm
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    This was a great article of information, i fi d very helpful in understanding that only certain cotton yarn styles are best in kitchen and bathrooms

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