Crochet Afghan

Why Are Crochet Blankets Called Afghans?

Mikey, The Crochet Crowd

Mikey, The Crochet Crowd

I am Michael Sellick, known online as ‘Mikey’, I am the founder and leader of The Crochet Crowd. I’m a ‘hooker’ at heart with the passion to crochet and play with yarn.

27 thoughts on “Why Are Crochet Blankets Called Afghans?

  • November 10, 2015 at 7:45 am
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    I always wondered what was the difference between afghans, throw and blankets.. For me it seemed the same.. I even asked few of my friends today for my surprise no one knew..happily realized that I was not the only one 😉
    Hehe thank to you, now I know…. 🙂

  • January 12, 2015 at 9:14 pm
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    Very informative! My mom always referred to crocheted blankets were afghan, I thought it was her own name for them, uh, duh!!! 😀

  • January 12, 2015 at 5:06 pm
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    Graphghan was a word I never heard until a friend posted a photo of
    of hers and I was instantly “What is this sorcery?? I must make them!!”

    A couple hours on YouTube and a great graphganing FB group and I’m hooked. (Heh see what I did there?)

  • January 11, 2015 at 1:30 am
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    I’ve never heard of graphgan…but then again, I took me a while to figure out that Afghan Stitch is now called Tunesian.

  • January 11, 2015 at 12:39 am
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    I’ve always used the terms afghan or baby afghan depending on the size. I’ve never heard of the word graphghan. Thanks for the info. I love The Crochet Crowd!

  • January 10, 2015 at 10:33 pm
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    Interesting! But as a True Brit I would like to point out that we NEVER use the terms “afghan” or “comforter”! They are blankets, throws or shawls! Just another little difference between us.

    • April 16, 2015 at 6:06 am
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      Funny, I live in Vancouver, Washington and I prefer to use blankets, throws or shawls but if its for a baby its a blankie.

  • January 10, 2015 at 10:09 pm
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    Nice article! I think the reason for “baby blanket” as opposed to “baby afghan” is simply the alliteration. “Baby blanket” just rolls off the tongue.

  • January 10, 2015 at 9:40 pm
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    Afghanistan, like Kashmir, is high altitude with very cold winters. Goats and sheep were/are their sustaining animals, and if you look at carpets and woven fabrics from these areas the patterns are fantastic (as are our crochet ones), but more importantly the fibre was soft, warm and precious and so they were highly valued. Early Victorian Cashmere shawls were and are highly prized and found in museums. I had always assumed that our afghans differ from blankets because they are soft and warm and part garment rather than just utilitarian. And all are unique and individual.

  • January 10, 2015 at 8:38 pm
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    I had often wondered too. My American friends refer to them as Afghans whereas I would normally use blankets regardless of size.
    I have also heard the terms ‘Granghan’ and ‘Grannyghan’ when the blanket is made using Granny Squares. Blanket suits me fine lol

  • January 10, 2015 at 8:33 pm
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    And, of course, the scrapghan.

  • January 10, 2015 at 5:52 pm
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    A rose, by any other name, would smell as sweet. 😉

  • January 10, 2015 at 3:39 pm
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    Bang out

  • January 10, 2015 at 2:26 pm
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    I’ve often wondered how many things in this world have come to be. I love reading bits of trivia concerning yarn and crochet. Thanks for your trivial pursuit of afghan vs. blanket!

  • January 10, 2015 at 1:51 pm
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    English, for me, is a second language and I did wonder about the difference between a blanket and afghan. I thought maybe its a question of trends and new words coming into the language. Now I know more. Thank you.

  • January 10, 2015 at 1:37 pm
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    Good job and informative. I’ve been wondering what you do with your completed projects? I suppose charity, but what about the things that don’t have a charity wanting them?

  • January 10, 2015 at 1:11 pm
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    Aren’t graphgans also called intarsia? Or is that something completely different?

    • January 11, 2015 at 7:48 am
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      I would love to make a graphgan for a granddaughter who just found out she has cancer. Not sure how to do it.

    • January 11, 2015 at 1:41 pm
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      Intarsia usually refers to inlayed wood products but is working its way into knitting and crochet.

  • January 10, 2015 at 12:53 pm
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    I have been wondering about the terminology. Thanks.

  • January 10, 2015 at 12:44 pm
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    Thank you! I have OFTEN wondered, but never asked, because I simply figured it was something that everyone ‘knew’ except me. LOL I’ve grown up calling them crocheted blankets or comforters depending on the size. And only during searches or when seeing a pattern I would come across the term ‘afghan’…..Then I would wonder? Why don’t they just call it a blanket? Now I know! 🙂

  • January 10, 2015 at 12:35 pm
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    Excellent article. Thanks for researchingcthe subject. I too use graphghan.

  • January 10, 2015 at 11:53 am
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    I love it. You forgot one though well maybe more then one, but the one that comes to mind,because it is my fav, is the scrapghan, it is many small pieces of yarn, different brands and weight, tied together then hooked into what ever size afghan your heart desires, because us die hard hookers can not stand to waste one little scrap of yarn

    • January 11, 2015 at 7:44 am
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      I didn’t know you tied them together

    • January 11, 2015 at 10:12 am
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      Very interesting, thank you! I need to start a scrapghan, I have space bag after space bag full of left over yarn, can’t let it go to waist!

    • January 12, 2015 at 4:30 pm
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      I wish I could post a picture here. There are different ways of doing a scrapghan. mine looks like a hot mess lol I tie all my scraps together and when I have a nice size ball I start. I do not weave in ends there is no set stitch and it consist of all brands and weights.

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