Evolution of The Crochet Hook: Let’s Compare

Mikey, The Crochet Crowd

Mikey, The Crochet Crowd

I am Michael Sellick, known online as 'Mikey', I am the founder and leader of The Crochet Crowd. I'm a 'hooker' at heart with the passion to crochet and play with yarn.

80 thoughts on “Evolution of The Crochet Hook: Let’s Compare

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  • April 6, 2014 at 1:17 pm
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    I have all the regular hooks plus extras…but started using the crochet dude hooks wont ever go back to the all steel, ,alumin or plastic or resin hooks…..gonna try the clover and tulip ones soon

  • April 3, 2014 at 9:38 pm
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    tried them all; the addi swing was comfortable to use; but really slowed me down; passed it along to my sis; my favorite so far is the bamboo handles on the steel hooks…love working with thread. also passed along those light up hooks; the light was too bright for my eyes of all things….those went to cousin of a cousin. trying to get used to the furls hook; so pretty but while I know I need to use that type of hook; still work faster with my aluminum boye. got some comfort grips to slip on them. the clover soft touch is the one i like best; but for speed; it’s my boyes. I like my clover amour hooks also. switch off the hooks which means switching projects and taking breaks help. thinking about trying those gloves. sometimes when the joints flare up; just got to take a break

  • April 3, 2014 at 4:31 pm
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    Reading this I was hoping you’d mention the Susan Bates bamboo handle/ aluminum hooks. I really love them! I’ve tried all kinds of hooks in different sizes and quality but it still reigns supreme. The price is ridiculously good for how durable and comfortable it is! With five years of use my most used 5.50 mm one looks only a bit worn and using it I’ve never had wrist or hand pain! It’s really a good set of hooks, I’d recommend them to anyone. And like you said, its got all of the qualities of bamboo, without the possibility of snagging and friction that can come with those, and all of the smoothness of aluminum, without the cramping 🙂 AH another thing is the shape of the tip of the hook is just perfect, this is the most important thing. Maybe it’s my technique, but every other hook I’ve used occasionally will drop or won’t grab loops and this one I’ve never had problems with that !

    • April 4, 2014 at 11:21 pm
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      I agree completely with your comments about the Susan Bates bamboo handled hooks.

  • April 3, 2014 at 4:29 pm
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    I do like the Tulip hooks, I’ve recently bought 2 of them. I’m a 40+ year pencil holding hooker. Years ago I transitioned to the Clover hooks and haven’t ever been disappointed in them. I’m just surprised that you didn’t review them in this article. They are on the upper end of the price scale but I believe they are a bit less expensive than the Tulip hooks. I have been ‘double jointed’ all of my life and that wasn’t a problem until I got older, then those ‘hyper extended’ ligaments are now complaining so I have to alternate between my pencil grip to a knife grip to keep my thumbs and hands from cramping up on me. The Clovers and the Tulips help best with this and the Crochet Dude does as well. Just another POV for anyone who was thinking of a Clover too…

  • October 28, 2013 at 6:46 am
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    Big thx to you answers many questions and I did not have to pay zillions to try too many hooks, have been considering furls crochet hooks don ‘t know what size to buy f g h I
    I have extra large hands take after dad
    Only want to buy one
    Crocheted 30 years ago, have taken a crochet class, great at looms, not enough practice yet, friend will teach soon. Should big hands use “H” ???
    Thx bonnie

    • October 28, 2013 at 8:17 pm
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      Bonnie, I don’t think that there is any size difference between the Furls hooks except for the actual hook and the shaft. The part that you hold in your hand should be the same size from hook to hook. When I used my size H Furls hook I made a swatch and indeed the H Furls made the same size swatch as the size H Susan Bates hook. It was quite nice to use.

    • March 20, 2014 at 4:26 am
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      The other thing you can do is contact Furls directly. From what I understand, if you supply them with your hand measurement, they’ll custom carve a hook to fit your hand size at no extra cost at all. They’re awesome like that, so you shouldn’t have to worry at all about your hand size 🙂

  • August 14, 2013 at 4:29 am
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    Totally agree — tulip etimo are the best and worth every penny!!

  • June 20, 2013 at 9:04 pm
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    I was having a lot of hand/wrist pain with cramping, so my hubby made wooden handles for my crochet hooks. Since then I have not had those problems and am hooking away. (;
    I still use the aluminum hooks, just have new handles on them.

  • June 20, 2013 at 6:26 pm
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    I need the comfort of a good hook… the tulip hook is my favourite… i crochet all the time and it suits my hand best… i agree with you about the health first… there are too many projects i want to try still, that i need to look after my wrist…its really worth it… i had problems with my wrists for a while and had to stop for a year and missed it so much…i would like to try a furls hook…ill just save up first… my skills have improved hugely since i discovered the ‘crowd’ and am ‘hooked’ on hooking even more…so, its so worth it for me to go for a higher price-point hook… i grew up on aluminum and steel hooks and like the weight

    • June 21, 2013 at 12:12 am
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      I just received my new Furls hook this morning. Already I can tell it is my favorite. It fits my had wonderfully and doesn’t split the yarns or loose the yarn, so I’m crocheting faster. So glad I ordered it. I have a lot of arthritis in my hands and thumbs and I’m sure it will help with that. I will have to save up so I can get the rest of the set. Just love it.

  • June 20, 2013 at 4:26 pm
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    I never had time to “craft” when I was working, now that I am retired, living rural, and have lots of time on my hands I am trying to learn. So far I have learned EVERYTHING I know about crochet from you, over the last six months. I just learned from this blog about Tulip Etimo Hooks, jumped on to Amazon and they are on their way. I found my arms and wrists hurting after completing a large plaid afghan, even though I sat as you instructed, so am happy to try anything that may make things easier, as I am totally “hooked” Thanks once again for your advice! So far you have never led me wrong so I am betting this will be good too. 🙂

  • June 20, 2013 at 4:04 pm
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    If I might make a suggestion…. I use the Crochet Dude Ergo Hooks from Boye and they have been a life saver. ZERO aches and cramps, no squeaking, and they are crazy comfortable. Bonus they are super affordable!

  • June 20, 2013 at 3:40 pm
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    I have aluminum hooks, resin hooks, plastic, bamboo and my favorite by far are the Susan Bates with the bamboo handles. Mickey said something about the availability of their products. I live in the US, but there are no shops that sell yarn or hooks within an hour of my home, so I have been ordering both online and from catalogs. Herrschner’s carries the Susan Bates bamboo hooks and they sell them both individually and as groups (they are not in a fancy case, they are sent out in a bag with all of the individual hooks in their original packing) making it easy to find them when you are isolated from craft stores. Hope this helps you find them if they are not sold in your area.

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  • June 20, 2013 at 3:21 pm
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    I use Boye brand. I have tried others, but I like the shape of the hook on the Boye’s better. I think it is because this is the brand my grandmother used when she taught me how about 50 years ago. I am 58 now and have her hooks, but think I am going to ask for some Tulips for Christmas and save up for a Furl – I think they are gorgeous!

  • June 20, 2013 at 3:13 pm
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    Hi Mikey great info on the hooks I use the metal ones but with the use of some memory foam and a wee sock crocheted over it my hook fits into my hand. First rule make sure your hook is comfortable then you can crochet longer .

  • June 20, 2013 at 3:09 pm
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    I like the Bamboo hook, I find it handles better. Who else agree?

  • June 20, 2013 at 2:58 pm
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    Somewhat related subject. Does anyone use any type of wrist support? I’m wondering if it would help or hinder.
    Thanks!

  • June 20, 2013 at 2:42 pm
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    Very informative Mikey, thank you. For 20+ years I had used your basic Boye & Susan Bates aluminum hooks. About 2 months ago I decided to try the Clover Soft Touch as I’d heard so much about them. I bought a size H and after 2 weeks of using it exclusively I bought all the rest of the sizes (8 hooks in all). All the pain associated with crocheting is now gone. I hadn’t seen the Tulip Etimo’s before you wrote about them here, they look amazing. Now I’m so tempted to buy one to try …. 😉

    • November 22, 2015 at 8:00 pm
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      I have been using the Clover Soft Touch for several months. I like them except for one thing. The handles aren’t long enough for me and the handle rubs the back of my hand. It is annoying and uncomfortable. After reading Mikey’s message about The Tulip hooks I believe I’ll buy one or two and try them.

  • June 20, 2013 at 2:34 pm
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    I’d have no problem investing in the higher-priced hooks if they would just please use the in-line hook design that Susan Bates has! Only with that in-line hook design can I crochet like the wind! For me, Boye-type hook ends tend to get stuck on the pull-through by hooking onto adjacent sections of yarn. I have used Susan Bates for decades because of the quick-and-easy pull-throughs thanks to the in-line hook design. I recently started using the Boye Ergonomic Handle (less than $5 at Walmart) with my Susan Bates hooks. It felt awkward at first, but I quickly got used to it, and I can crochet more comfortably and for longer periods of time now. Just wish it looked as pretty as the Rose set of Etimos 😉

  • June 20, 2013 at 2:19 pm
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    I have found that I tend to change the hook I’m using based on the material of the yarn I’m using. I love steel or aluminum for any yarn with acrylic in it. If I’m using all natural wool or alpaca then I prefer to use bamboo. I don’t like plastic or resin at all because it tends to be “sticky”. By that I mean the yarn doesn’s seem to glide smoothly over it. As I get older I will most likely use covers on the handles for better grip. I heard that you can get squishy pen covers and slip them onto your hooks for comfort. I may try this and see. It would be less expensive than buying all new hooks I’m sure. Thanks for this great article. I love to read about what other crafters are up to with their hooking.

  • June 20, 2013 at 2:16 pm
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    Love your review! I feel like you, my comfort comes first. There are many things we spend a lot of money on that don’t necessarily have a health benefit to us, time to change priorities. You realize this as you get older. So if you can afford it, buy what’s BEST for you, so you can continue to enjoy your leisures in good health!

  • June 20, 2013 at 1:50 pm
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    I use knit pro hooks now – they have a shaped comfort grip, and have eliminated my tennis elbow and wrist pain

  • June 20, 2013 at 1:46 pm
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    Thanks for the great info. I use Clover Soft Touch hooks and love them but recently bought a Tulip Etimo and loved that to, so much that I may permanently switch. I have a Furls hook on my wish list, they are so pretty and I would love to try one someday.

  • June 20, 2013 at 1:38 pm
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    OH WOW!!!! This is awesome information. THANK YOU so much. Who would have known the great difference in all these hooks!!??!!!!! I personally use the Tulip hooks and LOVE them. THANKS MIKEY for the great lesson on crochet hooks!!!

  • June 20, 2013 at 1:35 pm
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    I always used metal hooks for many years which always seemed fine. I’ve broken several plastic hooks and have given up on them. A few months ago I bought a set of bamboo hooks and thought the were ok but I wasn’t as impressed as I thought I would be. A few weeks ago I saw the Furls hook on your Facebook page and was fascinated by it but $40.00 was much more than I thought I would ever spend on a hook. Fortunately my birthday was a couple of weeks away so I sent the link to my daughter and was thrilled when she got if for me. I asked for the size I since that is the size I use the most. It is so beautiful and comfortable, I just love it. Even thought it is pricey, it makes a great gift.

  • June 20, 2013 at 1:27 pm
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    I use the aluminum Susan Bates hooks. Not because they are cheap, but because of the tip design. The thinner sizes are a bit harder to use even though I have small (petite) hands and have had surgery on my hook hand. Since I have less rotation ability, I find they work great for me. Plus they are incredibly light weight.

    I would gladly buy the more expensive ones with the thicker handles, but it seems as if they all have the “Boye” tip and with my wrist issues, I drop stitches too much with hooks like that.

    Plastic hooks are really cute and all but…”Oh heck no” for me. It’s a tactile(touch sensory) thing. Acrylic yarn rubbing on a plastic hook is like nails on a chalkboard for me. (on a side note, I wish I had only bought one when I decided to try them lol)

    • June 20, 2013 at 2:17 pm
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      Try the Susan Bates with the Bamboo handles. They are definitely worth the extra cost to keep the Bates hook but have a more comfortable handle. I think that you’ll like them. Make sure that they are NOT on sale and then use a 50% off coupon (JoAnn’s or Michaels).

  • June 20, 2013 at 1:23 pm
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    I recently purchased some lighted crochet hooks from CutRateCrafts. They are WONDERFUL!! I have been using the cheaper aluminum hooks for years, but these are ergodynamic (sp?) and feel so great in my hand! They are all the same handle size, have an on-off switch if you need extra light to see your stitches and a rubberized grip. I got them on sale for $3.99 each instead of the normal $5.99. I bought one in each size! I am so very glad I did now – shipping was $12.95 for all 8 hooks, but I got them in 3 days and before the email telling me they were on their way! Service is great!

  • June 20, 2013 at 1:23 pm
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    My favorites are the simple aluminum hooks with a coating (they are cheap too 😉 ). Next to them I also have some metal ones, but the aluminum are kind of “soter” to work with when the size is very small – the metal ones make my left indexfinger hurt after a longer time. I also have a couple of very long ones, ideal for tunesian crochetstitch.
    And now here’s the “recycling me”: the containers I store my hooks in is a plastic container that used to hold dental cleaning tablets or vitamin tablets. Exactly the right length and the soft plastic coverage protects the hooks.

    • June 20, 2013 at 1:24 pm
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      oops… soter should be soFter…

  • June 20, 2013 at 1:17 pm
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    I use Etimo Tulip hooks because I like the cushioned handles for my marathon crochet sessions and, the shallow hook to crochet faster.

  • June 20, 2013 at 1:14 pm
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    I love the Susan boye hooks. Size H and J are my favorites.

  • June 20, 2013 at 12:03 pm
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    I’ve been using basic multi coloured aluminium hooks which I got from ebay. a whole set for under £3. I don’t have any problems with my wrists, but I do find the end of the hook presses into the palm of my hand near my baby finger and after a long session of crochet it can make my hand a bit sore. I feel I need a slightly longer hook. I tried bamboo handled ones but I couldn’t get use to the flat larger shape and it still pressed into the palm of my hand.
    Someone suggested knit pro symphony wood hooks. they look pretty but if the length is still the same I think I’d still have the same problem. they are supposed to be better for arthritis sufferers and are much lighter. I’ve seen a full set of double ended knit pro hooks on ebay for £25. the sizes were 3-3.5/ 4-4.5/ 5-5.5/ 6-6.5 and 7-8.
    has anyone tried double ended hooks? do they come up longer?

  • June 20, 2013 at 11:10 am
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    Doesn’t this info really depend on how you HOLD the crochet hook? I hold my hook like a pencil, with the end of the hook resting in the space beween my thumb and first finger. I noticed you use an overhand grip. I have tried hooks with handles, but they just don’t work for me, or I can’t get used to them, so I use plain metal hooks (Susan Bates?). Maybe I have been crocheting too long (30 years!) … you know, old dog, new tricks. 🙂

    • The Crochet Crowd
      June 20, 2013 at 12:07 pm
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      For sure… how you hold the hook makes the world of difference and you may prefer a completely different hook because it. 🙂

    • June 20, 2013 at 1:44 pm
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      I was wondering the same thing. I hold my hook like a pencil, as well. I have been hesitant to try anything but my trusty Susan Bates hooks because of that. I like the shape of the head of the hook. I would love to hear response from those who hold their hooks this way and have tried some of the other hooks.

  • June 20, 2013 at 9:34 am
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    Super blog Mikey! I’ve just started using a Clover hook, I find it is comfortable. Haven’t used it long enough yet to see if it will help my wrist and arm pain. I was using the conventional Boye hooks. Time will tell. 🙂

  • June 20, 2013 at 9:24 am
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    Thank you for the article. I’m going to print off to refer to next time I buy a hook. I have many old aluminum hooks which I hate to stop using as they came from by grandmother, but I know some of these would be better for me. I recently purchased an F bamboo hook at a fiber show which was longer than most hooks. Something about the length makes is easier to hold and use. Thanks again

  • June 20, 2013 at 9:03 am
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    I follow a general rule….if the fiber is natural,use a hook made from natural material(wood,bamboo,ect…)If you’re working with acrylics then grab an aluminum hook.And by all means leave the steel hooks to us professionals who make traditional Crochet cotton lace.I love me some steel hooks.But if its price y’all are concerned about,check it….you can find most diameter sizes of dowel rods at yer local hardware store.Cut them to desired length….well you know where I’m going with this.If you really LOVE Crochet like I love Crochet you will utilize ALL of your resources to make it happen.

    • November 22, 2015 at 8:17 pm
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      I don’t see the need to be a professional to use steel crochet hooks. They are what I learned to crochet with. I made many doilies with no problem using the steel crochet hooks. The wooden dowels don’t sound like a good option to me. Why make my own out of inferior wooden dowels when one can buy perfectly good well made hooks at a good price.

  • June 20, 2013 at 8:13 am
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    I have the Boye in plastic and metal, Bates, Bamboo SB, Bamboo Tulip, and finally the Tulip Etimo hooks in 4 sizes. I wish I had bought the Tulip Etimo set as, like Mikey, these are my absolute FAVORITE hooks. I can crochet very fast as the metal is so smooth, plus the grip is the perfect balance of weight distribution, warmth, grip etc. I could quite easily get rid of all my other hooks and just use the Tulip Etimo. Plus, they don’t split your yarn. Thanks Mikey for such a great site!

  • June 20, 2013 at 12:38 am
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    I totally agree with you about the Tulip crochet hooks. I know lot of people have a problem with the price, but they are so comfortable to use. I just love them. I know sometimes you can get them a little cheaper at Amazon. They really help me crochet a lot longer then any other hook.

  • June 19, 2013 at 11:44 pm
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    One thing I have noticed is not all hooks are sized the same. I was using a size D hook and switched to another size D hook, both aluminum, but of dfferent brands. The size of the hook was slightly different, mostly as to the angle of the hook from the shaft. Especially with smaller sized hooks, it is important to use the same hook, or at least the same brand, throughout your project for best consistancy.

  • June 19, 2013 at 10:46 pm
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    Hi Mikey and the gang, I have a lot of arthritis in my hands and wrists and have always used the metal or plastic hooks. I am 52 today and can remember my first hook was made by my grandpa from a dowel rod when I was 5. I have loved crocheting since. Recently, as my hands have gotten worse, my friend suggested the bamboo hooks and for me they didn’t work to well. I found that they didn’t allow the yarn to slide enough. I am now using the ergonomic handled hooks by clover. They take a little getting used to since the handles are shorter and the handle is bigger, but they really have helped. If someone really has a lot of trouble they can ask their doctor if they can get a recommendation from an OT therapist. They can show them other ways to hold their hooks and even show them how to velcro them to hand gloves to keep them crocheting.. I guess the bottom line to this is never give up. Where there is the well, there is a way!

  • June 19, 2013 at 10:19 pm
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    I love my Tulip hooks! I have a full sets from 0.5mm to 1.75mm and 3.25mm to 6.0mm. Anything over 6.0mm is big enough to be easy on my hands.

  • June 19, 2013 at 10:15 pm
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    I was always curious about the hook you were using in the videos. Just loved them and now I know what they are, Tulip Etimo Crochet Hooks. Gotta get me one to try out! I have the Susan Bates and Boyles right now and have been using the DIY pencil gel grips but they stretch out and start to move around. A pain to readjust when you’re on a hooking run.

  • June 19, 2013 at 9:51 pm
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    This is great information. I am a beginner but did get rubber grips to put on my hooks 🙂

  • June 19, 2013 at 9:41 pm
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    Thanks for the great information. I bought an ergonomic hook at your booth at Creative Festival in April. it’s a Unique (HA Kidd brand, and also says Pony on the handle). The handle is orange soft rubbery material. I love it! Very comfortable, I hold my hook like a knife, and it fits very well in the curve of my palm. I bought the 4mm size and now want it in 4.5 and 5 mm sizes and can’t find any supplier locally. do you still have them and if so, could I order them from you??? Thanks a bunch.

    • The Crochet Crowd
      June 20, 2013 at 7:47 am
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      My Creativ Boxes are in storage. I’m not sure what sizes I have left. Know they don’t have sizes bigger than 5mm in that line at all. How many are you looking for.

      • June 20, 2013 at 9:16 am
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        Mikey, I sent you a reply thru your website email. I thought that was a better place for this request. Thanks! Judy

        • The Crochet Crowd
          June 20, 2013 at 12:08 pm
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          I did get it and printed it off so I won’t forget. I am not sure how easy it is to locate the hooks but i will put that on my Todo List.

  • June 19, 2013 at 9:36 pm
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    I have tried them all. I used the plastic and metal ones for years, then tried bamboo and rosewood which I liked for the feel. But it wasn’t until I tried the Tulip hooks that my wrist pain stopped. I love them, they have made a big difference. I ordered a Furls hook and it seems OK but it squeaks against the yarn (really!) which is bugging me so it will go back.

  • June 19, 2013 at 9:04 pm
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    Thank you. Now I know why companies can charge more for their hooks. I will try some of the more expensive hooks in the near future. Just never knew why I should spend more… Now I know!

  • June 19, 2013 at 8:56 pm
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    Thank you for the thoughts. I don’t crochet nearly as much lately because I’m starting to feel it in my wrist. I tank I may try one of the Tulip. I bought an Addi, but I don’t find it very comfortable.

    • June 19, 2013 at 8:57 pm
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      *think I may. Sheesh.

  • June 19, 2013 at 8:22 pm
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    I had a set of bamboo hooks in the 90’s and they were my favorites – mine were marked on the end of the handle with a stamp by letter only – they worked great but I have not found another set like them since

  • June 19, 2013 at 8:21 pm
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    I just got a Furls hook (size I) last week and have been making a baby blanket in the same pattern that I have made many times before. Thus this is a good comparison to the bamboo handled Susan Bates hooks that I have used for several years and still like. So far I am enjoying the Furls quite a bit. I hold my hook like a knife and find that the smooth surface of the Furls hook feels good on the pad of my thumb. I also find that I like where the end knob of the Furls sits in the end joint of my pinkie finger, because I tend to direct the action of my crochet hook with that finger. I think that I will eventually give a try to some of the small sizes. Another thing that I like about the Furls is that the hook is kind of a cross between the nicest features of the Bates and the Boye hooks.

  • June 19, 2013 at 7:49 pm
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    I bought the furls off u’r blog site. It finally arrived and I was very disappointed in it. I was hoping that it would help my wrist etc, but it was the opposite. The end had a metal tip that dug into my palm as it was too short, the hook end wouldn’t hold yarn properly and I had to constantly turn my wrist and it took forever to do a row. I tried it for two days and had massive pains in my biceps and wrists, so I sent it back. I have the boyle aluminium ones and they work great. I bought comfort grips but that irritated me as well. So yes each crocheter is different and each one of us enjoys certain hooks. I have no problem on spending money to find the right hook but at this juncture, the Boyle aluminium works great for me. Good article tho Mikey, true and to the point. Each of us are created differently and so is our hooks. 🙂

    • June 19, 2013 at 10:09 pm
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      I have a lot of problems with my wrists and hands too. I am using clover ergonomic hooks and they aren’t too bad. You might want to try them.

  • June 19, 2013 at 7:45 pm
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    Great info. Thanks Mikey!

  • June 19, 2013 at 7:30 pm
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    I love my Boye hooks and now that I have purchased the Boye Ergonomic Handle to go with them I can crochet in comfort! The set includes the handle and 8 rubber washers in assorted hook sizes. I still have one of those Furls hooks on my wish list! 😉

  • June 19, 2013 at 7:20 pm
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    Great article! I switched to the Susan Bates bamboo hooks a couple years ago and love them. At the same time I bought a couple soft touch clover hooks and didn’t get comfortable with them. I may just have to try a tulip hook, if I can find one, the next time I go to Michaels or Hobby Lobby.

  • June 19, 2013 at 7:14 pm
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    I prefer Susan Bates. I used to use a lot of BERNAT BERELLA “4”. Afghan Yarn when I made Afghans for family, friends also knitting. For the last several yrs. I haven’t been able to find it. WHY? I used to find in in South Bend & Mishawaka, In. I live 15 miles from South Bend , In. but live in Mi. Can U help me find BERNAT, BERELLA 4. Please Thank you.

    • The Crochet Crowd
      June 19, 2013 at 8:00 pm
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      You should get on Spinrite Factory Outlet’s Facebook and ask them. They are an outlet of Bernat and maybe able to help you.

  • June 19, 2013 at 7:05 pm
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    I have a lot of crochet hooks and mainly use the metal or aluminum hooks. I have been adding a clay handle to the hooks to make them more comfortable for me. I mold the clay around the hook and form it to my grip or the way I hold the hook when I crochet. I then bake it to the specifications of the clay and it is very comfortable. I don’t have to buy new hooks and the clay is very inexpensive. I get it at Hobby Lobby.

    • The Crochet Crowd
      June 19, 2013 at 8:02 pm
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      See it’s working for you because you are designing the clay fo ryour hands… it’s more difficult for an artist to make a hook that is suitable to the general population… Great job on your creativity by the way!

      • June 20, 2013 at 1:50 pm
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        I use the Susan Bates hooks and they are so nice they have a wooden round handle. I absolutely adore them.

  • June 19, 2013 at 7:03 pm
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    Wow! Very timely. I just asked a question about hooks on The Crochet Crowd FB the other day and voila! Everything I ever wanted to know! 🙂

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  • June 19, 2013 at 6:37 pm
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    Wow, what a great article on crochet hooks. I have been crocheting since I was around 4 or 5 and never used anything but a metal or standard plastic hook. I’m in my 50s and beginning to have pain in my wrist, I think it is time for me to upgrade to a better hook.

    I did try a hook with a fat plastic handle on it years ago and I just can’t crochet with it at all. I’m looking at it now and it doesn’t have any indentations in it at all, so I don’t think it is made very well. I’m going to give one of the Tulip hooks a try and see how I like them. Of course I want one of those fancy Furls hooks, but that will have to wait for a while.

    Thank you for the awesome article!
    Liz

  • June 19, 2013 at 6:30 pm
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    Great details Mikey. I recently purchased one of the lite hooks. flip a little switch and the hook area lights up. The handle is comfy and ergonomic. I bought it in my most frequently used size and didn’t have any problems with it until today. I’m working on a baby afghan with several colors.When I switched to the white, it began dragging. I went back to the bamboo handled one and carried on. Rosewood hooks were the rage for awhile, but I didn’t enjoy them because of the shape and occasional burr.

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