Teaching Kids to Crochet

Teaching Children How To Crochet

Mikey, The Crochet Crowd

Mikey, The Crochet Crowd

I am Michael Sellick, known online as ‘Mikey’, I am the founder and leader of The Crochet Crowd. I’m a ‘hooker’ at heart with the passion to crochet and play with yarn.

17 thoughts on “Teaching Children How To Crochet

  • December 11, 2014 at 4:35 am
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    Mikey I have been trying to teach my 10 year old daughter how to crochet, she is very excited about crochet but gets upset and wants to frog projects easily. I am going to use some of your tips in our next practice session and see if it helps. Thanks so much for posting this!

  • November 16, 2014 at 2:43 pm
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    I teach as many people to crochet as I can. If you want to learn I will teach you as long as you teach one person when you learn how. But I cheat. I start the swatch. teach them from the middle and after they have a concept and some control over the tension, then I go back and teach them how to start. I find that this method takes most of the frustration out of initial learning.

  • November 16, 2014 at 9:32 am
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    I have 4 grown children now and I taught them to crochet when they were young. It is difficult to teach your own children period. They think you are being critical when you are not. Having a total stranger teach while you sit quietly by is the best gift you could have given that mother. On top of it you are a great teacher, so I’m not surprised they children learned it. Excellent article. Keep up the fantastic work.

  • November 16, 2014 at 3:21 am
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    You know, it’s hard to teach crochet because it’s a body memory; something you do while totally by-passing your conscious mind. I’m a decent teacher, but I have a hard time teaching knitting and crocheting. You are a rare talent!

  • November 16, 2014 at 12:29 am
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    Good tips Mikey! I’ll use them with the grandkids when they’re ready!

  • November 16, 2014 at 12:11 am
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    That’s how I taught my daughter. She wanted to learn one thing: hyperbolic crochet. Period. She caught on quickly because I did not make a big deal out of it. She went on to make a small crochet coral reef, then lost interest in crochet. And that was that. If she wants to learn more, she’ll ask again. Am I disappointed? No. She has plenty of talents of her own.

  • November 15, 2014 at 10:41 pm
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    I have so been inspired by u Mikey! I talk about u all the time when talkin about crocheting!

  • November 15, 2014 at 10:31 pm
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    I run a crochet club at my daughter’s school. Last year I started with 42 kids in grades 4 & 5. This number quickly dropped to 3. This year, only one of those children came back. She just completed her first project. The numbers of kids in each club session fluctuates between one and 5, depending on the weather, lunch time activities, friends etc. And your hints are spot on. The kids that want to learn pick it up. The kids that are there because they have to be or because they have nothing better to do struggle with it. I’ve had several kids quit because when they got stuck, I refused to do it for them. I gave them the chance to work it out, gave them hints and showed them on a separate piece of work how to do this or that. They quit because they were used to having someone just take over and do things for them, and liked that easy option. It takes a certain kind of resilience to succeed in things like crochet, and not just in the learning of it. Teaching crochet is an art too. Thanks for your post. It has been helpful to me.

  • November 15, 2014 at 10:25 pm
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    You have some great ideas! I would add that I have the students make a small project for each stitch. i.e. shoestrings or hair ties for chain stitch, coaster for single crochet, etc. It keeps them interested to see what is next and gives them the satisfaction of completing something.

  • November 15, 2014 at 9:14 pm
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    I saved this article and will be referring back to it many times. Thank you so much

  • November 15, 2014 at 8:56 pm
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    Liked them and I would add, don’t be serious, I’ve never had a kid not want to learn what I want to teach. I love love my crafts, so do the kids. Teaching kids is tiring cause I’m up, down and all around, engaging them by constant positive strokes, that’s wonderful! You picked fantastic colors! Wow your fast, wow your taking your time, etc.

  • November 15, 2014 at 8:42 pm
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    I become frustrated easily but you Mikey have giggled me into calmness when you giggle through the hard parts. It truly has kept me crocheting and trying new stitches and patterns. You are teaching the child in me how to crochet. The adult loves it. Thank you! I’m afraid you are doing all you can do Mikey regarding the children. Don’t come in between a child and a parent. It’s frustrating when the parent takes away the opportunity for a child to learn but it is what it is – every where. Sad to see. Don’t give up teaching and don’t take what they do personally. Perhaps, your leadership skills will sink into the parents and turn it all around! Keep going!

  • November 15, 2014 at 8:10 pm
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    I’ve been asked to teach coworkers during lunch. These help me know where to begin.

  • November 15, 2014 at 7:58 pm
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    Great tips, you’re a legend Mikey!

  • November 15, 2014 at 7:46 pm
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    You were bang on….patience is the key….the teacher needs patience with the student and the student needs patience with themself…..

  • November 15, 2014 at 7:30 pm
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    I am super excited, my 10 yo son has decided he would like to learn!!! YAY! I just thought I would add one more suggestion for learners, light colored yarn is often easier to see the stitches than dark colors. My son is going to try to make a coffee mug cozy for his teacher’s Christmas gift.

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