Crochet Afghan, Ringtoss

Prices for Crochet Afghans: Reality Check

Mikey, The Crochet Crowd

Mikey, The Crochet Crowd

I am Michael Sellick, known online as ‘Mikey’, I am the founder and leader of The Crochet Crowd. I’m a ‘hooker’ at heart with the passion to crochet and play with yarn.

140 thoughts on “Prices for Crochet Afghans: Reality Check

  • October 8, 2015 at 4:39 pm
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    I don’t crochet but want a particular blanket made. Could you tell me how I can find someone who would make it for me, to purchase from them? THANKS so much for any help with this!!!

    • Mikey, The Crochet Crowd
      October 9, 2015 at 7:38 am
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      Julie… We don’t provide that service. There are many crocheters who start projects that never finish and/or something goes wrong. You can ask on The Crochet Crowd Facebook and see if anyone is interested. We don’t match up people so if something goes wrong, we are not responsible for it. Hopefully you understand.

  • April 28, 2015 at 9:05 pm
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    I have been making lots of items, the most sought after is the grocery bags i made for my family and myself. When people ask me why don’t I sell them I have a pat answer…. If I charged $7 a DAY for the labor used to make that, it would be way beyond anything people would want to pay for. It works. And it makes the people who have them proud of the fact that I would go to that much trouble to make them 5 or 6 bags like that. Labor of love is the name of the game. If I had to make them to earn money, I would never touch a hook again!
    The rest of the time, I spend experimenting and giving my best efforts away… or making videos of things I think someone else would like to make. (love that!)
    Added to that, crochet is my therapy and keeps my mine off of lonely places since my better half died.
    Nope, those who don’t craft just can’t see beyond the factory made cheap items they can get for a fraction of the money and loving time spent on hand made items.

  • December 6, 2014 at 4:58 pm
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    Good article! I donate most all of my crochet projects, some for Breast Cancer Awareness or to my local fire company for their fundraisers. If I sell an article, I take the cost of the yarns used and double that amount. That works well for me. I crochet for the love of the craft, not for the money.

  • September 25, 2014 at 10:20 pm
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    For pricing crocheted items I use price of materials x 3. I am having much better luck at selling however I do agree that venue is important. Would not do farmers market or flea market but church craft fairs generally do well so long as they advertise. Also local festivals are good. I don’t do venues that are a weekly thing unless they charge an admission fee. Those who pay to get in have no proble paying for creativity.

  • September 23, 2014 at 10:57 pm
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    I used to sell at craft shows…I made all kinds of crafts. I learned early on that I had to get the materials at the lowest price possible. Our local craft/fabric stores offered 50% off coupons quite often. So if I needed 9 skeins of yarn for a project my kids and I would make 3 trips to that store that week, and each take a coupon and buy a skein. My now 13 y/o daughter was buying with coupons at age 2! The one craft store employee remembers, and said recently “All you could see was the top of her head. You’d see 1 little hand put the item on the counter. A little voice would say,’Here my coupon’, as she put the coupon on the counter. Then she’d put the money up on the counter.” LOL!

    I still take her with me and MAKE (LOL) her buy something with a coupon when I need more than one item. I try to NEVER pay full price for ANY craft/fabric item.

    Now I just crochet for gifts…or to donate to charity because people really don’t know how much money and time goes into the beautiful things we make with our hands.

  • September 23, 2014 at 6:36 pm
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    I think you were Bang On in the article. Not only do I crochet, but also do custom machine embroidery, quilting and sewing work. I recently made a baby layette set – blanket, sweater, bonnet and booties. It was an immediate pattern. I charged $50.00 and thought it was on the low side for the 4 pieces. But I enjoyed making it and the grandmother was thrilled with.

  • September 20, 2014 at 9:00 pm
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    This information is eye opening. I like you just give away my work as gifts. If you are with other crafters you get an idea what the $’s they would sell there items. Those who do not craft have no idea the $ or time spent on each project. Thank you for your uplifteing advice.

  • April 6, 2014 at 10:10 am
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    I just recently made an infant dress that I was going to donate and a friend saw it and begged me for it, she had a baby shower to go to and wanted to give it as a gift. I ended up making a diaper cover, two hats and booties to go with it. Yarn was $3.50 on sale and being baby items didn’t even take the whole skein. She offered me fifty for it. Ended up just giving it to her, made me feel good she loved it so much. Then made my sister in law an infinity scarf for her birthday, she loved it as well and suggested I sell them, when I asked her how much she thought I had in materials only she guessed $10, materials alone were $40. It was a beautiful scarf but even selling it at $45 for a minimal profit just didn’t seem worth it to me

  • January 20, 2014 at 3:06 pm
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    Instead of being insulted, have the math prepared, with the cost of materials and labor at least at federal minimum wage calculated. Then throw on a guilt trip about jobs going overseas. I suspect the insulting offers are a result of people not understanding the cost of materials and the labor that goes into a handmade item.

  • July 31, 2013 at 9:22 pm
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    There is absolutely no way I would even bother to sell my items. Many times I get offers that in truth, are actually insulting to my time and resources and talents. I am not bitter but I am starting to get annoyed with it. I crochet for myself to make handmade items for my household and sometimes as gifts. But even with gifts, I am careful who I give them to. If I think they will not care for nor appreciate the item, they will not get that as a gift but instead they get something else. Time is valuable and once it is gone, it is gone. Many times I will put hundreds of hours into a big blanket and people ask me how much for it? Then they don’t even want to pay me $2 per hour let alone minimum wage. Or when people only want to pay you just $3 for 40 hours of work once you deduct the cost of materials. So, I tell people sorry! Now I do post online my creations to hopefully inspire others to pick up the craft. But to sell those items, no way, not worth my time until people here in the USA want to pay what it is worth.

  • July 11, 2013 at 2:39 am
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    A gal I know runs a boutique twice a year and her advice was to price items at 2 or 3 times the cost of the materials. If the pattern was intricate you would tend to lean toward the higher number. If something more simple (like a baby afghan) the 2x figure would be more appropriate.

  • July 3, 2013 at 6:12 pm
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    Back when my kids were babies and I wasn’t working outside the home, I usually charged 2.5 times the price of the yarn because the consignment shop had their cut too. I did pretty well with that system, but I also had several people come to me a couple months before Christmas asking me to make them several pieces they could give as gifts. In those instances, depending on the intricacy of the pattern I would charge them 1.75-2.25 x the cost of materials. They got a deal and I made money. I always tried to catch yarn on sale too so I could keep the prices reasonable and keep my products moving. Hope this helps.

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  • June 29, 2013 at 3:44 am
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    I tried to sell some of my market bags at a yard sale a couple of weekends ago and only ONE person bought one! I won’t come down in price as it costs me almost $5 for the yarn for one bag and all I ask is $5/bag that someone will get years of use out of. I’ll make maybe $.50 profit per bag and I like to make them but it did still take me more than an hour to make one and for someone to tell me that it’s overpriced is just ridiculous and an insult. I’ve had my original one for about a year and it’s a tough cookie, those “re-usable” bags you can buy for a dollar get holes within a few months then have to be tossed! How is that good for the environment!? lol, sorry about the eco rant 🙂 As always, Happy Hooking!

  • June 27, 2013 at 8:37 am
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    I sold a shawl once for $60. Then the same woman came back to me asking for more for ladies at church. I love to crochet but as soon as it becomes a job, it seems to take the fun out. I crochet and give them as gifts. I mostly use yarn I have around, but the crocheting keeps me out of trouble (from eating- lol) & relaxes me. If someone does approach me for something, I end up undercharging & ask that they not say what they paid for it.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:51 pm
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    It’s all in the marketing, particularly product placement. Considering what you want to sell them for, to reflect the labour and artistry that has gone into the project, you would have to aim for the high end of the market. Picture who your ideal customer would be and try to please them when you are making decisions about what to make, the quality of the yarn to use, fashionable colourways etc.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:28 pm
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    I just bought some baby yarn half price. I will be able to make things and sell them for half of what I normally would charge. If you want to you can always just charge 3x regular price of mats but, I wouldn’t feel comfortable taking in extra.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:26 pm
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    I have actually had people in my family who sell at craft shows all around the country. Never sell yourself short. The pricing is as follows: no matter how many hours you have put into it you will never recoup that but, the formula is this 3 x Materials cost. I therefore look for bargains so I can sell for a bargain. example: I made an afghan I sold. Paying regular price for yarn would have made the price nearly 155 dollars. I was able to cut that down to 120 dollars by buying yarns that were on sale and making the afghan. I then discounted it further for the person who is a relative and that person paid the 120 and said to me not to sell myself short. This relative doesn’t crochet but, loves to give homemade gifts from the heart.

    • April 6, 2014 at 6:03 pm
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      I made 4 afghans for a lady one Christmas. My formula for how much was 3 X materials also. Since they were queen and king size, I made some nice money making them.

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:57 pm
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    I crochet baby blankets for Project Linus, but I don’t sell them. I get to pick the colors, yarns and patterns I want to use, and work at the pace I choose, then donate them to a worthy cause. That’s much more fun than getting underpaid and having to follow someone else’s design choices! I did make an ear flap hat for my daughter, and offered to make them for her friends if they just chose a color they wanted. It was fun to experiment with some different yarns, since I didn’t need more than one ball for each hat, and they were all thrilled to get a free hat. I got a great photo of all the kids in their hats, which I sent to the lady who sold me the pattern, and she added it to her Ravelry page.

    If I want to make something for charity auctions, I make earrings, because I can make 12-15 pair in a night, and they give the auction something that people without a lot of money can bid on. I usually suggest starting the bid at $5.00, so even high school students can afford to participate and feel like they are involved in donating to a worthy cause. A $75 donation from me is still of value to the charity…

    I found out that for tax purposes, I can only claim the cost of materials for the charity items I donate. I still need to gather up my yarn receipts for last year!

    I had one doctor offer to buy a baby blanket from me that I was working on for charity. I declined, and it made me feel good to know that a poor or sick child will get a blanket for free that a rich person can’t buy!

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:40 pm
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    If I CHOOSE to do so, I will make it for you for the cost of the materials or as an outright gift.. If I can’t make a living wage (# of hours it takes PLUS AT LEAST minimum wage), I’m not going to do it. My time is valuable to me.

  • June 26, 2013 at 9:40 pm
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    Mikey, I agree with you, and I wonder if the problem has to do with how many people also crochet or knit – the “I could make that myself so I’m not going to pay someone for it.” Of course they probably won’t but that doesn’t stop them from not buying the item.

    The most I’ve ever made for anything is $30, for a crocheted poncho several years ago. Right now everything I make is either for me or a donation (I make chemo caps and items for the homeless); I’d like to eventually start selling what I make but I haven’t yet designed anything that I think is unique enough for people to want to buy it. (Of course not being in touch with – or even interested in – what’s in style doesn’t help… 🙂 )

    • October 7, 2013 at 8:01 pm
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      I just found out about a website etsy.com where people sell there handcrafted wares. there are some beautiful items and you can get a very good idea what to charge for items by how popular some of the designers are.

  • June 26, 2013 at 9:21 pm
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    I sold several baby blankets this year. 6 to be exact. They were not very big. 5 colors, 12 rows of each color and a nice boarder. I sold them for $ 45.00 each USD. They were for a friend, she loves them and gave them as gifts. I was out of work and the extra money came in handy. Now a days I am just making things for fun and myself!

  • June 26, 2013 at 8:42 pm
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    I was asked to crochet a poncho for a neighbors dil, the yarn cost $30.00, (it was on sale!) Took me a week to crochet, i crocheted the poncho, cowl and clip on flower. I was handed a check for $45. I’m going to go back to crocheting for fun and donating the items to shelters and nursing homes.

  • June 26, 2013 at 8:22 pm
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    I agree with most of the comments. I sell my baby afghans for 3x the price of materials and $7- 7.50 an hour. I most I’ve made is $100. I prefer to crochet for charity, give as gifts and make family heirlooms. I love the art of crochet and I refuse to allow my passion to stress me. Passing this art form to others is like paying it forward. I love teaching people to crochet especially children.

  • June 26, 2013 at 8:16 pm
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    I have sold a few afghans…mostly I got $35 or so. One I did a couple years ago for my husband’s director..I told him. $35 but she actually paid $90. If I had to depend on the income from crochet…I’d be much tinier cause I’d be lucky to eat one meal a day. Like almost everyone else…I crochet for me and then share it with people because both the creating and the gifting make ME feel good.

  • June 26, 2013 at 6:57 pm
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    I made an afghan only one so far and been crocheting it for more than a year (lol) although i crochet everyday, but the afghan was a granny squares, each square different colors so i spent long hours trying to match them as much as possible becuz i used more than ten different colors. It is 2mx2m and i never had a piece of crochet admired by all tastes loke this one. A friend wanted to buy it and he offered 30 usd!
    Best thung to do to make money from crochet is either selling patterns, or making small decorative items. Another is crochet with really thick yarn. U have to be selective about the thick yarn. Ecause nnot everything looks nice in thick yarn; i tried baskets, rugs, maybe a simple sc blanket. Crochet really tiny appliques and flowers and sell them. Besides, competetion is high from countries who produce crochet in bulk and sell them really cheap price like china. Check sites that sell crochet in china, u will find 1000grm of crocheted tiny flowers sold for as cheap as 1usd!
    Also u can buy the cheapest quality of yarn for ur project to besold, trust me, they dont appreciate what yarn is used. Or use old tshirt to. Ake tshirt yarn there are many videos showing this on youtube.u can also recycle plastic bags and make baskets.

  • June 26, 2013 at 6:56 pm
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    I have sold quite a bit of my work over the years… Cost depends on quality/expense of yarn, pattern and length of time it takes me… and with that all factored in, i usually take the yarn cost times 2-3 to come up with my price. My largest blanket was a Queen size blanket and i charged $100 for it plus shipping… but it was in a very inexpensive washable yarn in a super easy pattern. I typically charge $50 for a baby blanket size blanket and feel that’s a price point that is fair and covers my expenses and allows me to continue to crochet/knit… it’s enough profit to self-fund my habit. I’m never going to get rich doing it. The key to sales is to pick patterns and colors that appeal to people, not just an easy pattern that you can knock out quickly. Also, choose the best yarn you can find for the task. Over half of my sales come from custom orders.

  • June 26, 2013 at 6:53 pm
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    Usually people ask me to knit socks. I don´t enjoy knitting socks. So that´s a big fat “NO!”. The most ridiculous requsest go like this:
    “Would you crochet a sweater/afghan for me?”
    Me:”Ähm…no.”
    “But I´ll pay for the yarn!”
    Me: “Oh, I barely know you…and you don´t expect me to spent hours and hours working on something for you AND pay for the yarn? How sweet! ”
    In Germany a lot of people seem to think, an afghan is done in 2-3 hours.
    I´m more into crocheting freaky things. Like undead teddybears. Or crocheted food. Favourite question:
    “WHY would you chrochet french fries???” Well, why not?
    At least: My yarnbombed bicycle is now featured in my favourite yarnshop. I managed to sneak in some small items too…maybe I´d be able to sell some. (^_^) /
    P.S: Love your Ringtoss Afghan! Greetings from Germany !

  • June 26, 2013 at 6:37 pm
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    I have tried over the years to sell blankets locally, but no-one was really interested. There was only one I managed to sell, which was made with interesting yarn, so your theory seems correct on using the more expensive yarn to make something more saleable.
    I regularly sell booties online on a local facebook page where people sell things.They take about 2 hours to make, and use approx 1/2 a ball of yarn. I use the every day soft yarn that costs about $4. I sell them for $15. I have only ever been asked for a lower price, and I politely said no, and explained that the time involved would mean Im getting paid less than $8 an hour. That soon shuts them up. 🙂

  • June 26, 2013 at 6:08 pm
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    When I first started selling my crochet animals I had to ask my aunt who does A LOT of craft sales about pricing. She said to take the cost of the materials and add 3-5%. Taking her advise I have been able to sell a bit, not at the prices I know are needed to sustain a business at making these things, but I do make enough from one animal to be able to afford more materials. Since I can usually get 2 or more out of just one skein (depending on size and other variables) it works. The most I’ve made was for a Lion I was asked specially to make. I hated all the patterns I saw so I made my own. It cost be about $20to make and I got $30 for it and I could easily ask and get $40.

  • June 26, 2013 at 5:50 pm
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    It is so sad , but true that handmade items are not respected as they should be. Paintings and quilts can be sold for much higher prices than yarn projects or other crafts. This is a shame because there is just as much art and creativity in these things as quilts and paintings.

  • June 26, 2013 at 5:41 pm
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    I think a big part of the problem is that most people, at least most in North America anyway, do not see knitting or crocheting as an art form, even if the person that knitted or crocheted the item developed the pattern themselves. They see our work as a craft and heck, their kids can do crafts so crafts cannot have much value to them.

    I too have been on the receiving end of very insulting offers for my work. I used to do the craft show circuit and people would ooh and ahh over my 100% wool hand knit sweaters that cost me $65 to $75 or more to make (and that would be for a smaller size) and then offer me $15 dollars for one because the lady two tables over is asking for $15 for her sweaters that were clearly made from acrylic yarn and judging by the odd colour choices the yearn was bought from a bargain bin because the store could not sell it.

    One item I was very successful with was a treetop angel that was crocheted from size 10 cotton. They cost me about $2.50 to make and I was able to sell them for $15 each (about 20 years ago). I was able to make 6 or 7 a week while working full time and it was a good supplement to my income. I sold hundreds of them.

    As for large items such as afghans, I give them as gifts to friends or family or donate them to charities. I have had friends offer to pay for the yarn but I refuse those offers because I learned early on that if you allow them to pay for the yarn they feel as though they bought it from you. Next thing you know you have friends asking you to make 2 or 3 for them at the same price, likely what I paid for the yarn or less, to give as gifts. I even had a friend of a friend, whom I had never met, call me to place an order with me to do an afghan for her just like the one I did for my friend only larger and with different colours and since it was to be larger she offered me $35. I felt so disrespected by that offer that I don’t think I picked up a hook for nearly 10 years.

    I recently regained my joy for crocheting but never again will I charge for it. Gifts only from now on!

    • June 26, 2013 at 7:11 pm
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      Yes, That “Could you make “a little” something for a friends friend Mother? ” – Question. And of course her birthday is just three days away…and she would like a nice doily. Big enough to cover her table. *roll eyes*

  • June 26, 2013 at 5:24 pm
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    A PS to my comment, the Etsy shop is now inactive which is why I didn’t share its name.

  • June 26, 2013 at 5:21 pm
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    I opened an Etsy shop several years ago with every intention of making enough to actually call it supplemental income. Hello, reality check! If we would have had to buy food with that “income,” we certainly would have starved! It was months before I sold my first item. Having said that, a few of my knit and crochet items have sold for good prices. I also found that custom orders tend to fetch a much higher price than items that were already listed. On custom orders, I always requested partial payment in advance to cover the cost of materials. My first crocheted afghan fetched $75.00. The most I’ve charged for an afghan was $350.00 for a custom order blanket for a double bed . It was knit squares of various colors with tons of sewing 🙁 to complete it. No way did I cover the cost of my time with that or any other items. But as you said, I knit and crochet because I love doing it and always have three or four projects going at a time. Coincidentally, I happen to have an order for a custom afghan right now.

  • June 26, 2013 at 5:21 pm
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    I have many years experience of crafting, knitting, and crocheting under my belt, have sold my wares at many a craft show over the years, and take commissions for various items for friends and family, and I would have to agree that many non crafters, knitters, crocheters don’t appreciate the time and effort that goes into crafting a handmade item. Having said that, I’m sorry, castigate me if you will, but even I think $800 for an afghan is an unrealistic price. Yes, I’ve seen the formulas for calculating what price to charge, and I realize that the cost of yarn seems to rise daily, but think of it…..how many people can really afford to pay $800 for an afghan, even if it is handmade, even if it were made of 100% silk, or the finest wool? See…in my experience, the people who usually buy, or who ask me to make them something and are willing to pay for it, are the ones who TOTALLY appreciate a handmade item, but even they aren’t willing, and could rarely afford to pay $800 dollars for an afghan. If you’re looking to make that amount of money for your items, I honestly think you’re going to be sorely disappointed.

  • June 26, 2013 at 4:55 pm
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    I crochet among other thing and sell my projects in a variety of venues. I consign to store, I do craft shows as well as getting involved with the armies market and of course her on fb. For just a baby blanket I charge no less than $45.00. I have found though that I you make smaller things that take less yarn an work you end up getting more of ur pay back in the end. Character hats sell well for me, about $18 a piece but its also one of those things I don’t enjoy making. I think the whole point is though that you get what you pay for. A one of a kind item or something mass manufactured with snags everywhere. People will most always choose what is cheaper at the time. Sad but true am just one reason I as if yet have not attempted to make a afghan and sell it.

    • July 22, 2013 at 5:22 pm
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      I agree with you completely!!!!

  • June 26, 2013 at 4:51 pm
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    In my neck of the woods there are several things going against any crafter selling items. 1. There are dollar stores and deep discounts stores that sell things that look like hand made but are not . The quality is very poor. 2. There are people who do make things. They crank them out for very cheap pricing. They find yarn in yard sales or it is given to them. Some of the yarn is also not the best quality. These people make simply granny afghans or chevron patterns. Any pattern that doesn’t require much detail. They sell at the local events or farmers market. They do not take the time to hide the knot, make borders or anything that really finishes it. 3. The economy and the supply and demand has really changed everything these last few years. Non crafter is really the main target for craft items. They do not know about the cost of materials or time involved. But know that the area is flood with these ridiculously cheap things. So they expect super low pricing. And why pay more for a blanket than the big box retailer who will have it on sale or clearance soon enough. Better yet at a yard sale for next to nothing.

  • June 26, 2013 at 4:33 pm
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    If you want to make money, you should sell small items that neither take a lot of time AND yarn, but are very useful or desirous . Make it either colorful or with very interesting color mixes that go together in an eye-catching way. Ensure your quality is there and the stitching is very good. I would plan things that take only about 1-3 hours at most to make and less than 1/2 of a ball of yarn, unless it’s a small and cheap ball of yarn. Then sell for about $15-30 for the finished product, depending on what it is. Don’t sell on Etsy or sites like that. Too much competition and many of the people who visit there already know how to knit and/or crochet. Create a website for yourself and market to your friends, their friends and make the website search engine friendly.

  • June 26, 2013 at 4:21 pm
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    Thanks for this blog post. I don’t crochet but I do knit and quilt. It has confirmed that 1. People have no idea how expensive and time consuming it is to produce quilts sweaters etc. 2. People are looking to pay what they could pay at a big box store.

  • June 26, 2013 at 4:00 pm
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    i make what i want to make and eventually the person the project its supposed to go to will show up. I made a rainbow afghan 3 years ago and held on to it, i enjoyed making it and thats all that mattered to me. this last March i met a young man who was a total sweetheart and i found out that his birthday was in a few days and BINGO i realized the blanket was for him. He was ecstatic to receive it and that just made the time and money spent on that project totally worth it. I have never tried to sell anything more than crochet bookmarks for a church bazaar HAHAH

  • June 26, 2013 at 3:46 pm
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    I’ve found that people do not realize the cost of materials much less your time. This is not only true for crochet but for any sewing or craft project. I’ve been burned too many times, so now I just make things (crochet, sewing, crafts) and give them to people because I want to. In fact, a couple of years ago, I was very busy and did not have time to make a few alterations to the dress I was wearing to my granddaughter’s wedding. I was referred to a lady who did alterations. She had the dress ready in two days and was only going to charge me $10. I gave her 3 times what she was charging, since I knew her time was worth much more than $10.Any type of handwork, at least for me, has never been anything I could depend on to make money – I was lucky to come out even. Therefore, I only make things for gifts.

  • June 26, 2013 at 3:37 pm
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    I have sold items ranging from small to large afghans. I will do it as a special request but I do not like to sell the crocheted or knitted items because I cannot get a fair price for the price of the materials and labor. I do gift the majority of what I make.

  • June 26, 2013 at 3:11 pm
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    I was asked to make a scarf for a male co-worker. I used a bulky yarn, and it didn’t take very long, and considering this was 10+ years ago, I wasn’t very adept. Price was only discussed at time of delivery, and I was willing to accept $8 for cost alone. If it hadn’t been for the older lady who sat in the next cubicle commenting that I should charge more, it may have stayed at $8. Final tally was $12.

    When I became better at hats, I tried selling them at the corner store, where they sold handmade crafts by local folks. I asked my hubby what he would pay, he said $14. I ended up charging $7 for adult size, $5 for the kids. Didn’t sell a one, but they did go to charity.

  • June 26, 2013 at 3:01 pm
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    Love the 2 Afghan that you have pictured. (Ringtoss Crochet & My Never Ending Granny). Is the pattern something you create? If not do you know where I can purchase the pattern?

  • June 26, 2013 at 2:52 pm
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    I have to disagree on some points – Yes, if people approach you asking you to make them something if you are direct and up front with them that you will charge them yarn cost + time, then one of three things can happen (in my own experience): (a) If they are serious about owning the item you make then they understand the value of your work and will not have a problem with a quoted reasonable price, (b) they will give you a funny look when you tell them the price, and you’ll spend a bit of time explaining that crochet cannot be reproduced by machines, therefore they will not be able to purchase a similar item in crochet in a local store (but they can a knitted item… *snicker*) or (c) they were never serious in the first place / scenario you described. I have had all three happen to me.

    I will say this: when making handmade items for sale, I have found that craft fairs are the BEST market for this. Online (like etsy and the like) people can’t see the vibrant colors, feel the texture, gauge accurately the size, etc. But, craft fairs can also be like people. I like to go to them first, then if it looks like a good market, sign up the following year.

  • June 26, 2013 at 2:29 pm
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    Donating, whether to an organization or to family and friends solves that problem for me! The items I make are always a gift from my heart to whomever receives them. I usually leave several afghans around whenever we have guests…..that way, if someone admires something, I can “gift” it to them on the spoit! That’s what makes me happy…….not money.

  • June 26, 2013 at 2:12 pm
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    I haven’t read all the replies so I do not know if anyone has said this as yet. Sedie of Yarn Obession has a great eBook that you can purchase on how to price your crochet fairly. It has a lot of great information on what you need to take in consideration and how to price pieces for commission, retail, wholesale and more. She also has a free eBook on how to start a crochet business. Her website is http://www.yarnobession.com

  • June 26, 2013 at 2:09 pm
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    At regular estate auctions, very, very few craftwork and needlework items sell for more than $25. The hours of work are not respected. There is a large supply and little demand for used needlework or craftwork (unless it is over 75 years old and dated.)

  • June 26, 2013 at 2:08 pm
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    I used to charge $125 for a baby blanket, $80 for specialty hats, and $25 for simple hats – and had so much business I was turning people away! Eventually I had to quit doing commission work because the stress of trying to keep up with the orders was just too much.

  • June 26, 2013 at 2:02 pm
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    At auctions, crocheted afghans sell for $5 to $15.

  • June 26, 2013 at 1:57 pm
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    I’ve only sold smaller items (beard hats, beanies, baby accessories) and taken orders for them. Most of what I make is for myself, family, friends or charity. And when I do sell items, I also double the cost of the yarn, adding a little more if it was a difficult item. I did have a friend want to purchase an afghan I made once, but I think she had some sticker shock. 🙂 That’s OK….I’m still in love with it and use it.

  • June 26, 2013 at 1:54 pm
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    I agree with everything you have said, I have made several afghans, hat, booties combo that I’ve gave as gift to all my nieces n nephew and a lot of family members, I have sold some christmas gift that I was paid 60.00 for 2 towel toppers n a pair of butterflies I made 3 sets, and I was paid 40.00 dollars for a afghan one of my first projects, I love to crochet n I feel bad to charge anyone there the ones who offer to pay me. I think charging 200.00 or 300.00 for any crochet project is overly priced. I dont think anyone would even pay anything over 75.00, depending on the item. Idk mixed feeling about pricing.

  • June 26, 2013 at 1:53 pm
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    The only items I sell are my plastic tote bags. I sell them in a craft shop for $10 each (that’s 50 cents an hour) and I don’t pocket the money. It is donated to the Canadian Cancer Society in memory of my husband. In the three years since he passed I have donated over $1.000. and most of that was from bag sales. All other items (and some bags) are made to give to friends and family.

  • June 26, 2013 at 1:51 pm
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    There are some people out there (non crafty types) that throw out an insulting offer with the thinking that… ‘you are here to take some money home at the end of the day, and you best get what you can while you’re here and give me the deal of a lifetime.’ It’s unfortunate that these people have the audacity to even think this way, but it is even more unfortunate that there are folks out there that will cave and take the offer. Don’t think so little of your craft and yourself that you would accept a low-ball offer. If you need money to put food on the table… I can see haggling before caving, but I personally would never let something go at below material cost.

    Also, it’s best to have a good amount of smaller items that can sell at a profit. If you’re bringing in money from those types of items, you might not have to consider taking the insult.

    • June 26, 2013 at 4:03 pm
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      Very good point, April. 🙂

  • June 26, 2013 at 1:48 pm
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    I sold an afghan for $95. It was many pieces woven together and it was after a county fair when a woman stalked my work. She wanted it for antique rocker! I really didn ‘t know if I wanted to sell it, but if I kept it all I would have done is store it — so I sold it. She took asking price so I sold.

  • June 26, 2013 at 1:32 pm
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    I frequently sell items to my coworkers charging 2-3 times the cost of materials. I don’t advertise for business, people come to me. For bigger projects, like afghans, I talk about price up front so they realize how expensive things can get. I think my pricing is reasonable, so much so that I always get repeat business. Of course I know what I’m charging isn’t worth the time spent making the item but at the same time making a few bucks for a hobby isn’t a bad deal either. I could never live off of it but I stash the earnings away for rainy day money.

  • June 26, 2013 at 1:29 pm
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    I agree with the 2xs the cost of the yarn is the norm. I understand that u feel ur time is important but the craft world doesn’t. This is why I don’t sell my crochet. It’s usually given as a gift. And, I know this sounds awful, but only to people who will appreciate it. I put a lot into
    my work and want it used. Do u know if u send a homemade item in the mail they will only insure it for the price of the materials used. Your time is not considered.

  • June 26, 2013 at 1:20 pm
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    Again, a HUGE tack to the bubble, but my mother has custom ordered several “Knit” or Crochet “Suits” in the past – Pleated Skirts, and embellished Sweater tops … and other Sweaters that she couldn’t seem to live without … It has bee twice the cost of the yarn, and she purchased the yarn for the projects herself .. trust me, some of the patterns were very complicated, and still the “Sweaters” or the “Suits” have cost her less than any “Hand sewn cutesy applique hoodies!!” but the price is the price, not the value .. She realized that, was in a position to pay her a large “tip” for her services, or to gift her special yarn, but when you pay $75.00 for an embellished pre-made hoodie – takes 1/2 day to sew on the appliques, and only $60.00 for a sweater that took a week to make – it is a love gift to the artist .. UNFORTUNATE to be sure!!

  • June 26, 2013 at 1:10 pm
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    I once sold an afghan for 60 dollars. That was about 25 years ago. It was a filet crochet pattern of roses measuring 5′ x 7′. After that it seemed that all the consignment shops went to 50% profit. Which meant that whatever price I put on an item the shop would get half. I was disgusted with the fact that I put in many hours of work on it and the shop owner only had to sell it and we made equal profit. I also once sold a hat that I made and wore out to a pub. This guy paid me 20 bucks for it right off my head. lol. Ever since I have made and given everything away as gifts. I have had many people ask me to make them socks and offered to pay me for them. I just don’t know if they realize that it will take me as long to make the socks as it would to crochet an afghan. :/

    • June 26, 2013 at 1:14 pm
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      The sad fact is, that while the people who want top wages for the work that they do, feel that a person who knits or crochets (or any other type of handmade item) should work for pennies. Otherwise, they will “just go get it at walmart.” I say go for it. They might get something similar to what they wanted a crafter to make, but the quality, precision, and care will not be in that item. One will get what they pay for as the comparable item will not last to be handed down through generations like a handmade item does.

  • June 26, 2013 at 1:04 pm
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    I made a snowman hat for my niece’s daughter, and before I knew it, I was getting orders upon orders for them. I charged $10 each. Which was pretty low compared to other ones. I think I made of total of 15 of them. One of my niece’s friends had asked me to make 10 for her grandkids .. so I did, happily I might add. Then came the Christmas rush where I had to get my own gifts made. Her friend who purchased the 10 from me asked me to make 4 more the week before Christmas, I said fine but I will have to charge 25 each then, because if I was not going to be able to make things for my family, I was going to have to give them money. The woman refused and found out that she only had 2 grandkids and the rest she had sold for 25 each. It kind of stung that she did that because I could have sold them for more, but was selling them at a lower price because these were my niece’s friends and classmates of her daughter.
    All in all most of what I make I give away, even when I have intentions of selling it as I am making it.

    • June 26, 2013 at 4:37 pm
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      I feel your pain. Never give out a deal for a quantity of items. They are taking advantage of you whether they keep them or sell them. Always sell at the regular price. In this case it would be $25. IF you wanted to do someone a favor for one then tell them the price of $25 but tell them you’ll do the first one for them for 1/2 off.

  • June 26, 2013 at 12:58 pm
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    I was commissioned by a dear friend to make 5 crocheted dolls that looked like each member of her immediate family. These dolls were about the size of the American Girl dolls. I also crocheted the clothing for them as well as extras to personalize each doll. A couple of the girls wear glasses so I used wire to shape glasses and then crocheted over the wire. She gave me $50 per doll. I felt fortunate to be able to get that much for them yet also felt bad asking that much. She told me that she felt they were worth every bit of that.

  • June 26, 2013 at 12:56 pm
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    You say ” It’s insulting but also a true reflection of the value of hand creativity here in North America. I believe that average person, including me, would never be compensated for the true hours involved when creating crochet and knitted projects”. As long as we all continue to believe that, it will continue to be true. I have seen it change in other generes of handmade art and craft and know it can be true for knit and crochet as well. We just have to believe it, expect it and demand it!

    • June 26, 2013 at 4:05 pm
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      Exactly! No one expects a furniture maker to accept $2/hour.

  • June 26, 2013 at 12:56 pm
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    I have to agree with EVERYTHING you said!! Most of my crocheted projects go to family, friends and charity at, of course, no charge. I have been lucky enough to sell a few handbags because, like you said Mikey, they were different from most that you see. And with afghans, like you, I have never done two of one kind. The one is indeed the “experience!” 🙂

  • June 26, 2013 at 12:53 pm
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    I was told that you figure in your price of materials plus your time at minimum wage, add the 2 together, then multiply by 3. Example: yarn $16., time 10 hours x $7.50 = $75.00′ plus $16. = $91. X 3 = $273.00 for finished product.

    • June 26, 2013 at 2:27 pm
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      I use that method, but then I divide the final number by 2. lol… $136.50 (or) [YARN COST + (HOURS X MINIMUM WAGE)] X 1.5 🙂

    • June 26, 2013 at 4:37 pm
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      Three times the cost of yarn, maybe, but nobody will pay you for triple the rate of minimum wage (in this case, $22.50/hr, better than most out-of-home jobs). If that were the case, more people would be selling their items for a living! If your yarn cost you $16, then you’d be asking from anywhere between $32-$48, plus or minus depending on the level of difficulty.

    • June 26, 2013 at 5:09 pm
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      I highly doubt anyone would pay that amount. At that rate, an afghan would go for thousands. But nice try.

    • June 26, 2013 at 5:26 pm
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      I always heard 3 times the cost of your materials. Try even getting that price.

  • June 26, 2013 at 12:44 pm
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    I am an experienced novice at crochet – no longer a beginner, but can’t quite grasp the intermediate level. I LOVE making afghans – ANY size. I have not tried to sell them, but everyone in the family has one of my creations. So, now that the family is “comforted”, I am making lapghans which I will be donating (“gifting”) to a local convalescent home at Christmas. I have talked to the staff about it and they will be presenting one of my gifts to those who do not have family or other visitors, at my request. It is really sad that someone who still has life in them is left to die, alone.
    I have often thought about starting a weekly crochet/knitting session there – that is an idea still in the works.
    Back to the point…. When someone sees my work and wants to buy it, I tell them they can buy it and give them a price of 2-3 times the amount I paid for the yarn. But I usually end up just giving it to them,. It makes me so happy to see them smile and know they are going to appreciate it, use it and care for it. If someone asks me to make them one, I tell them bring me the yarn and I will make it. Then I provide the type and amount of yarn I will need – that way they will be able to choose the colors they wish it to be.
    I also offer to teach them how to crochet. Of course, I direct them to Mikey’s videos!!! He IS the best teacher of our craft!

  • June 26, 2013 at 12:39 pm
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    I agree also. Putting so much work into crocheting anything at this point should be done strictly because you want to and not because you want to profit. Yarn is so expensive now and the economy is down and the combination is a bad mix. I tried and had some nice stuff. So I decided to crochet what I enjoyed and give away as Christmas gifts to my family, or just for things around the house. The prettier the yarn, design, and finished product, the more expensive it is. I was going to make something that required yarn that happened to be on sale, but the amount needed for the sweater was more than the sweater would cost in the store. Welcome to 2013.

  • June 26, 2013 at 12:27 pm
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    I have made a lot of afghans that have been given away as gifts to family and friends but have not sold them for just this reason. I do make and sell hats and baby items. The most I have charged so far was $47 plus shipping for a Minnie Mouse skirt/diaper cover, with matching hat & booties. It would not be worth my time and energy if I did not do it for the pleasure of creating cute things.

  • June 26, 2013 at 12:15 pm
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    An exception are the bears crocheted from thread on ebay by Berta Hesen-Minten of Threadteds.com When I saw her tiny bears selling for seriously over 100 dollars for a two inch crocheted item I thought “I can do that!”. Well, I can’t. I am a good crocheter and I have sold bears for around 25 which is about 2 dollars an hours. I also have sold hats for about 15 which seems to be a fair price. But if you check etsy there are some decent prices on crocheted items though. but even then, probably not even minimum wage for the maker.

  • June 26, 2013 at 12:08 pm
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    Back in the day I made our house payment with my crochet. At that time and in my area of the country, it was standard to charge 3 to 3 1/2 times the cost of the materials. Because crocheting usually isn’t like putting in an 8 hour day aat an office, for instance – because it was “crochet a few rows, put it down, fix lunch, crochet a few more rows, put it down, feed the cat,” etc., it was difficult to charge for the time spent. However, those of us who sold our work usually added an extra charge if the pattern was especially intricate or complicated. Many of us had the added policy of requiring either a down payment equal to the cost of the yarn or the purchase of the yarn itself before we would make something for a customer. Occasionally one of us would go ahead and create something (an afghan or toddler sweater or layette) to sell at a booth at a craft fair but as a general rule we didn’t start a project until we had a down payment or the yarn in hand.

    I no longer make things to sell with rare exceptions. This winter a friend asked me to make several beanies for her to sell at the store where she worked and she paid for them at the outset. Any markup/profit the store earned on resale was theirs. Recently another friend has opened a gift shop with Native American-themed items and has asked me if I would make an afghan or two in American Indian patterns for her to put in her shop. We decided not to make a consignment arrangement but the price of anything I make for her will reflect the cost of my shipping the item to her, the price of the materials, her percentage, and my profit. If they don’t sell, they don’t sell and either she will buy them from me outright to keep as gifts or return them to for me to use as gifts.

    My attitude these days is that I crochet for the love of the art and give away almost everything I make. So if someone wants to buy something I’ve made, that’s just gravy. But if someone comes along and offers my gift-shop friend less than the asking price for an item, she will say no – the price isn’t negotiable.

    For me, even though I live on a poverty-level fixed income, it’s not about the money, it’s about the art.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:52 am
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    It is the very reason that many do NOT appreciate the amount of work & heart that goes into a handmade project that I rarely sell my work. I will gift it to those I love. But, woe unto the one who unloads it at a swap meet or a yard sale. They get nothing else from me. The same is true of those who may say, “is this all?” My favourite thing is to knit/crochet for charity or causes.
    Did I make $. Nope. But, I put all my heart into helping someone else–that is very important to me.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:51 am
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    I totally agree with you I have tried in the past and never was successful at it so I make for the family and give them as gifts. That way I get the satisfaction of knowing I gave something from my Heart and not because I sold it. Of course if someone offered to pay me for an item then I would be more than glad accept if it covers my expense otherwise I will keep it or gift it.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:50 am
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    oh and one other tip — if you take credit cards — you are more likely to sell a higher priced item than if you just accept cash or checks. i can highly recommend Paypal’s PayHere. i use my iPhone and the free card reader and bam, money in the bank … plus, they have a debit card you can get now that can be used just like a credit card — no need to transfer funds from PayPal to your bank account …

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:47 am
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    I sold an afghan for $250. It was a special order for Christmas and for a king size bed! That was unusual for me, but the woman also had me make 3 other afghans that I was paid $150 each. Most of the time, if I’m selling something, I just double or triple the cost of the yarn depending on what I’m making. I don’t do shows or anything. Mostly it’s friends or friends of friends or family that I sell things to. I enjoy making items and giving them as gifts or to a charity.

    • November 4, 2015 at 4:11 am
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      Thats awesome! I made an American Flag Afghan , its gorgeous & i wasnt sure about pricing but my grandma told me not to let it go for less than $300 so this is nice to hear

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:46 am
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    Mickey ,my sister in law used to hand quilt ,and I bought one from her once and paid her 300.hundred dollars for it and later she wanted to buy one of my afghans and I told her to give me what she wanted to ,,and she gave me 70. dollars ,to me I had just as much in my afghan as she did her quilt but I sure cant get much out of them ,I don’t sell mine, I give them away to whom I want to have them and I get all my enjoyment out of that ,,plus I love to crochet..

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:44 am
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    I agree with you 100%. The most I’ve received for any crochet project was $50 for a layette set which included a Christening coat, bonnet, booties and a custom designed blanket to match. It took me 3 week to do it and almost $10 to mail it so I felt a little cheated on the price but honored that they asked me specifically to make it for them. I’ve given up trying to sell blankets because I too get insulted when they don’t even want to give me the price of the yarn. It amazes me the amount of people that want to know how much I will charge and when I tell them a price that only includes the price of the yarn, they are insulted. Someone wanted me to do a king-size afghan for $50, hello.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:42 am
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    i got $200 for a granny afghan i did in a style similar to one that i had from my great grandmother. but the person who bought watched me as i spent several hours laying out the squares on the floor and pinning it together (to keep the continuity of the pattern) and then stitching them together. she had seen part of the process of making the squares but not all of them and she knew what hard work i had put into it. there is no way any one else would have given me that much for it … but because she witnessed a good deal of the process she was willing to put the money into it.

    unfortunately, i can say that the same dynamics for “value” or “worth” play out in most craft areas. i also make jewelry and the long hours i put into designing the pieces, finding the right metals and stones (and paying for them — sterling silver ain’t cheap honey!) and then crafting the pieces (along with all the costs involved in having the right tools) and wear and tear on my arms and hands as i bend and hammer the metals — people can’t even begin to appreciate all that goes into a pair of earrings and then to have someone say “$20 … for a pair of earrings — i could do it for less” — let me see you try sweetie is all i have to say.

    the people who make big money doing their crafts are the ppl who have bucks to market themselves and get the notice and following. and the uniqueness of the pieces has to be there or you have no market. ppl want cheap (read: made in china or india with child labor) because most of them have the “walmart” mentality (hey, i shop there too — don’t get me wrong), but that’s not how handcrafted is made and it’s not how it should be priced and the ppl on etsy who sell a pair of ‘sterling silver look’ earrings for $5 make the rest of us look like we are overpriced. just saying …

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:40 am
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    I agree with you also, Mikey. I just make items for family and friends. If it is something that I want to make and I know that it is not a choice of either, I keep it for myself or give to charity. It is the creation of a pattern using yarn I love that gives me the “completeness” feeling ~ money would never do it ~ no matter how much.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:37 am
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    I sell baby afghans from $20 to $40 max and adult afghans $40 to $60 depending on how complex the design. My prices are based on the old statement. “What the market will bear”…what the people in your area are willing to spend. If you go to different craft fairs in your area, compare the prices other crafters are pricing their items and the quality of their products, then determine your prices.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:35 am
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    My standard price for a crocheted afghan is $195 unless it’s larger than a queen or a more expensive yarn is requested. The best piece of advice I can give is to advertise via Etsy, Facebook or word of mouth that you create custom afghans. All of mine were sold to customers seeking an heirloom piece that reminded them of an important person or place in their past. That is where you will find those treasured people who will value your talents. Mikey my dear, I’ve actually had people laugh in my face when I’ve told them I’m a professional crocheter/fiber artist so I feel your pain when someone lowballs your masterpieces. It certainly cuts deep but every time I make someone happy with a crocheted afghan, slippers, etc. then I win! Ha! 😀

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:34 am
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    Ps I put all my blankets in a gift bag that way I can put in my business cards. the person who gets the afghan will know who made it and if they love it they can order more.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:32 am
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    You are right, I give my afghans and other projects as gifts. My daughters friends are having babies and they truly appreciate the blankets, makes my heart smile.
    Although when I see the prices they ask for the cheaply made comforters in the stores I wonder why people will buy those and not something handmade and of far better quality. Oh well, such is life.
    Watching my family barter over the last two afghan challenges is enough payment for me.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:31 am
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    The most I received was $60 for an extra long scarf I made with some recycled silk yarn. When I got the yarn, I just started crocheting and as I knew it was going to be a scarf, I wanted it to be a scarf with a little rockstar attitude so it’s about 8 feet long. A friend liked it so much, she asked if I would make one for her for Christmas and her husband would pay me for it. I gave up on trying to sell anything, but I did sell a few hats when I was working at Whole Foods and they had an art show where team members could show and sell their crafts.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:31 am
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    For the love of crochet & $ benefit = donating afghans & hats to charities for tax deduction value. Best $ for a crochet project I’ve experienced = purchasing dk green netting, crocheting 3″ green kitchen scrubbies, adding little red yarn bows, sold for $3 ea.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:30 am
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    I haven’t sold my afghans, but they they go for a good price when they are a raffle prize. I mostly give them as gifts, donations to charities etc. Last Christmas I did sell 30 Boutique scarfs for 12.00 each, that didn’t pay much for my time, but did pay for the yarn and a little extra for more yarn.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:30 am
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    I totally agree – there is no way people are going to pay true value for an afghan. However, smaller items such as scarves, simple bags and can coolers will usually sell for much better value. Go figure! I love making afghans, but they are always made as gifts for special people – gifts of warmth, comfort and love.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:30 am
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    The problem with selling crochet items is that the only people who understand the work that goes into them are other crocheters… and then we just make it ourselves 😉

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:27 am
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    I sell my baby afghans for $85 dollars kid afghans for $100 dollars adult afghans $150-350 dollars. 5% discount to seniors. I have my own business cards . I put a lot of cards in if I know the afghan is for a baby shower. More customers. LOL people always ask who made it. The cards tell them and where the can order one.
    People think I charge to much. They try to offer way less. But I won’t take it less money. I do sell all my blankets. Most people just buy the baby afghans. I hope this help Mikey

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:25 am
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    I agree, MIkey. Getting the money back on what you put in a project is hard to do. I just make things for myself and family, and occasionally for fundraising for a local non-profit. I get much more joy when I give an item for a gift. I love making people smile. (I like the compliments, too. 🙂 )

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:17 am
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    I received $75 for an afghan I made. I make lapghans using scrap yarn for about $5 and purses as well. It does take a lot of work but the faces on surprised/happy people is priceless. The work is well worth it. I’ve crocheted 2 blankets for a church group my mom and I belong to and we raffled them off. One made over $500 and the other over $800. The money raised is for scholarships and church festivals breakfast items.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:16 am
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    I sell my graphghans for $150. However, with all the work it takes I kind of think it’s worth much more than that.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:16 am
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    I have sold afghans for $100 to $125 BUT that was to a boutique who supplied the yarn, pattern and who sold them for $300 and up range to high end buyers. Finding a company that you can do that kind of work for is where you can actually make money for your craft. People are so used to Wal Mart prices (low costs due to being made overseas for little to nothing per hour) that they don’t want to pay what things are really worth. I make more for my time by making small items, baby hats, baby blankets, etc. I ask $50 for a large, crib sized baby blanket or $25 to $30 for one of the cute animal-shaped baby hats that are so popular with photographers right now. You have to keep your products new and not copy what everyone else is making so that your items stand out. I also use Red Heart super saver and and written “washing/lay flat to dry instructions”
    so that the items retain their new look as long as possible.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:16 am
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    All of my work gets given away. If I were sell the work, the idea of twice the price of the yarn is very appropriate to me.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:11 am
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    Hi Mikey…
    I am so glad you brought this up… I am actually furious and have created a fb page because I was so MAD!!! You see I am also a crafter (quilting) but crochet and knitting were my first crafts that I learned as a child (thank you mom for instilling these crafts in me!!!) I am met with this question everyday… and people think that because I am a mom and that I stay at home and create at home then I can basically give it away for free… apparently I have no overhead… really… try feeding 4 kids… using help to deal with daily chores because these orders take so long… power for my machine… time I spend buying the fabric… gas to get there.. etc… plus what about the fact that I use my sewing machine that needs cleaning and maintenance more often then others…. because I use it so much… And the time it takes me to design.. cut, sew and finally quilt my quilt… oh forgot… and mostly hand bind….. So please don’t ask me to sell it to you my dear potential customer for close to nothing… so here is the deal… in order for us crafters to be happy we have to educate our clients on the reasons why our items are the price they are… use high quality thread, fabric, yarn etc and ask what you are worth… if they can’t afford it.. well then they can’t be your client… ***pst… I learned this little trick too… they can make payments to afford to buy it.. So crafters and Mikey join in my blogging journey at http://www.facebook.com/CraftersForIncome … we are ARTISTS not slaves my friends… value yourself and your craft!!! I do!! so join me and post and share all you want!!! Thanks and hope to see you on the other side!!
    Talk Soon,
    Ewa Kaczkowski

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:09 am
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    I crochet ALL the time…and give away about 90% of the items, including a fair number of baby blankets to Operation Linus. To be compensated for what I create…you’re right, you’d never get the true value. I was asked, one time, to make a clutch for a bride and I did. She offered me $100 for it – it was an intricate lacy pattern – but she’s my best friend and i said no. It’s the love I put into everything that makes it special, not the money I could get out of it.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:06 am
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    I was recently paid $30 each for 4 character beanies & my customer was a friend. It was also what she offered to pay me (she wrote the check & mailed it before I could argue). I do agree with the comment about double the cost of yarn but I also think you should try to get something for the time you spent making it, especially if you are making it to sell. I tell people that question my prices “you don’t work for free, why do you expect me to?” I also point out that I am not (insert big box store here). If they want something dirt cheap/mass produced then shopping in my booth/etsy store is not for them. I don’t mass produce my stuff & it takes time/materials to make things, so I am not afraid to ask a fair price for them.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:05 am
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    I, too, agree with you 100% about the reality of pricing hand-made items. The most I’ve ever gotten for anything is $100 for a personalized chart-crocheted afghan for a friend’s daughter. I normally ask for the price of the yarn + $30 for any afghan, which generally puts them at about $50-$60. I also generally use Red Heart Super Saver to keep the cost down. Unless the buyer actually knows something about yarn, it’s hard to explain the differences to them. When I do craft shows/church bazaars, I generally just sell small items like hair accessories, dishcloths & scrubbies, scarves, maybe a purse or two, and have a display of larger things like afghans and take orders for them. It’s sad that the value of hand-made items is so low here in North America, but I honestly don’t know if you could get proper value anywhere else.
    And Mikey, do you have a pattern for that Ring Toss afghan? That is GORGEOUS! I want to make one!!! 🙂

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:04 am
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    I agree 100% with you! The highest I received for an afghan was €80, cause it was my good friend who bought Ocean wave afghan for her mom’s birthday. They even offered to pay me as high as €120 (since they are also artist who made handmade stuffs from woods).

    But, talking about general things, it’s very difficult to match with what I’ve been doing all these times, mostly they are asking for a really low price, not even enough to cover all the materials.

    I’m still selling crochet products up to now and I always asking at least 5-10 friends & my husband, who are doing handmade business & having the same problems for their opinions, and then I make an average out of it (as long as it covers all of my costs).

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:04 am
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    I received $300 for an afghan once and $100 for a shawl. There is no practical way to be recompensed for time and talent, not to mention just the cost of yarns. I do not enjoy making items for sale, so most often I just make things I want (and I want a lot…certainly enough to keep me always busy) or I make to bless those I love with something unique and beautiful. And I only give my work as gifts to those who I know will treasure them. Otherwise, they get gift cards! LOL!!! It keeps the frustration to a minimum.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:03 am
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    I make tiny little amigurumis out of thread. I had a friend, who is a painter and knows the value of time, pay me $20 for a small owl. I told her I would do it for $10. When another, non-crafty friend asked me about a turtle I made, and I told her I would do it for $30 she thought I was crazy. People don’t understand, or care that each of those 8 teeny weeny pieces were handmade and then have to be assembled. I, too, don’t sell my work. Mostly just gifts and donations.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:02 am
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    The most I’ve received for a crochet project to date is $55 for a baby blanket (I’ve now sold 3 baby blankets with an average price of $50). A tip to share: when people are looking specifically for handmade, they expect them to be well made and to pay accordingly. Yes, $800 is quite a lot to ask, and no, you don’t seem to really get compensated for your time, but you can still sell for a reasonable price. Know your market – are you selling online or locally? Search around Etsy to compare prices, but know what your cost is and price it how you see fit. Use descriptions if selling online to explain why it’s worth that much (special yarn, intricate pattern work, etc.).

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:01 am
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    I chalk it up to the fact that most who do not craft, and therefore are the customer for these items, have no clue at all how much the supplies cost, and how much labor is involved. All they have to compare it to is what they see at Bed, Bath and Beyond and Target. Quilts and throws are a dime a dozen at these places, cheaply made overseas. That is our competition. That is why I have pretty much given up selling, and instead create for my own pleasure, and for gifts (but only to people who appreciate!) Who wants to see all that work wind up on a thrift store rack???

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:01 am
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    I have made several children’s sized backpacks. I have gotten $40 each, and sold maybe 7. I used the basket weave stitch. Added some nice novelty buttons and pewter charms. They looked great but took about 1-2 weeks as I made the stitches really tight. I has several people ask for specific colors and then make them and then decided they didn’t want them after all. Waste of my time and money. I now will not do anything unless the cost of the yarn is given up front. Info however make things for family and friends just because. They are way more appreciative of handmade things for gifts than anything store bought.

  • June 26, 2013 at 11:00 am
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    I have been donating crocheted afghans to my Local Fire Department’s Feather Party for years.(20+).. The amount that the afghans raise covers the cost of the yarn at least by 4 times and honors the Fire Department with the funds raised… I think my reputation preceeds me as people always approach with comments on how the afghans look like new after years and years of use… I donated 3 afghans to another Fire Department’s fund raiser… One American Flag and 2 others using high end yarn… Each of these afghans went for $17.50… While that did not affect my donation in any way, it was an Insult to the Department .. Yes, it’s nice to get something for nothing, but this event was to raise funds to help defray medical costs for a Fire Chief… Felt so badly that I almost bid $20 just to get the afghans back and donate them for an event that possibly would benefit more…

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:57 am
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    The highest price I’ve received for an afghan is $80 and the customer purchased the yarn. I was around 17 yrs old and a neighbor wanted one for her daughter. I thought it was a great price and was excited she was actually willing to pay me to make it. Even more excited that she paid me to make a 2nd one for her other daughter. I sold quite a few afghans to neighbors, but never put them online to sell. I’m satisfied with selling the larger items to people I know who will truely enjoy my hard work. I know that selling online – I will never get the $ it’s worth – but more than that, It means more to me when it’s for friends and neighbors than a complete stranger.

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:57 am
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    This is why I don’t sell afghans. I usually just give them as gifts and sell smaller items. I recently got $70 for 3 pairs of slippers but they were HUGE and I’m still not sure that was worth it. It was my fault though because I underestimated the amount of work…I’ve learned not to underprice my work because that just brings in the wrong customers. People who understand the craft and the hours of work will pay the right amount.

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:55 am
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    I agree, an offered low price is an insult, often coming from someone who can’t/won’t make the time to do it, but realize the work involved. I donate my ‘gans from projects past to nursing homes and shelters where I know they’ll get well used. Now I’m going to field your questions…
    1. $75 for a rustic spun wool rug.
    2. If you’re looking to make a profit, check out your local goodwill or salvation army for discounted supplies, local community centers for supplies that are donated, get w/ your friends for a “craft swap”, keep the items modest and functional, like potholders, towel toppers. bags, and so on. When you have a tote full, get a table at a street fair or annual flea market or community yard sale. A table in your front yard won’t draw enough people. Think fun items, I make ears of corn potholders that sell for $5.
    3. I’m a long time yarn hoarder (I see a reality show here) and always check the discount bins. I went on the lapgan kick and donated 30 to a local nursing home around the holidays. I had more fun chatting w/ the residents about their favorite crafts and one of the men said the furry yarn I used reminded him of his dog from long ago.
    The bottom line is to do what you love and love what you do because in the end you can’t put a price on joy.

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:53 am
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    I also do and sell floral arrangements. My general rule of thumb is I leave it up to the buyer, and except whatever the pay me. I was at a craft sale and here is what I did, I took the price of what I had in it and doubled it. We will never have the time we have invested in a project reimbursed. So doubling the price of the materials used is about as fair as it will get.

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:52 am
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    This is why I LOVE LOVE LOVE Etsy. You can not only see the price range other crafters are asking – you can see whether they have actually SOLD any of that item. And materials matter a lot – 20 hours of work doesn’t mean anything to a buyer if they don’t like the feel of the finished project, or know the yarn well enough it will pill like mad after the first washing… and (in spite of the durability of RedHeart) I don’t think afghans have the same collect-ability / perceived value as a quilt with the same materials cost and hours invested…

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:51 am
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    Your article about selling projects was really good. I have been told that I should sell my stuff instead of giving the items away. I donate a lot of hats for shelters, baby blankets for family babies (and there are lots of them!) but I will only try to sell items if I ever need the money badly, and God has been good to me–I have not reached that point. If I get requests from anyone to make an item for them, then I do expect them to pick out and pay for the yarn, but that is as far as it goes. I get joy out of crocheting.

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:50 am
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    I’m still reeling over $800. Yeah it would be nice but totally unrealistic, to me anyway.

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:50 am
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    I recently had a request for 3 different afghans…(1) Zebra patterned (2) Dallas Cowboys, star logo (3) Miami Dolphins logo. I designed the patterns myself. I was really hesitant to give a $250 price quote as I thought…no way would someone pay $250 for 3 afghans! That sums up to $85 per afghan, which was double the price of material! Maybe being as this was my friend (ex sister n law), confident of my work, she didn’t bat an eye at the price! I asked for cost of material upfront then remaining balance when finished and delivered.

    So, if someone is truely appreciative of the ‘lost art’ and talent, they will pay what YOU, the artist, think it is worth!

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:48 am
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    Totally agree with your comments! I crochet, knit and also make quilts. And many, many times have been asked to sell an item for less than the cost of the yarn/fabric! I only make items for gifts, and charity and I enjoy doing so. Personally, I think making things for sale would take the fun out of the process for me.

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:48 am
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    I agree. In North America, there is very little respect given to any handcrafts. It always surprises me when people don’t take into account the TIME and skill involved. They look at a hat (even a simple beanie) and won’t pay more than $15 for it. We all must have magic wands and create these items that can be used for YEARS with a simple wave of our hands.

    I make beadwork, and it’s the same thing. So frustrating. However, I’m still trying to sell. But crochet? Not so much. I’ll make gifts, and if someone wants something bad enough, they’ll have to buy the yarn at the minimum.

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:45 am
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    I agree with you. You will never get what it should really be valued at. I have sold a couple of shawls that I have made for around $25.00 but I have yet to sell one of my afghans. Right now I have one that I made with a high end dollar yarn and it is a king size one and I am only asking $80.00 for it and everyone says “Oh how beautiful but it is way too much money if you would take like $25.00 for it I would get it”. At $80.00 that only covers the yarn costs barely so I have the attitude if you want it bad enough you will pay what I ask for it otherwise I have no problem keeping what I make. I also have lower costing afghans made with lower cost yarn that folks ooo and ah over but don’t want to fork out the $25.00 for them. Oh well, their loss is my gain.

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:44 am
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    Honestly, I crochet because I want to and I love to. Usually I give items as gifts. I don’t create to make a profit. When someone asks me to make something for them…I am happy to recover the cost of materials. I have several return customers who are happy to pay double the cost of materials (and would probably pay more if I would accept it), but, again, I am not looking to profit…crocheting is my therapy and that is payment enough! LOL

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:44 am
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    I normally charge twice the price of yarn, plus shipping (if need be). I crochet because I love the creative process of it! Getting a little extra money to fund my yarn addiction is just a bonus!!

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:43 am
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    I agree with you 100%. I received $90 for an afghan once, but it the buyer was a friend who paid me more than I asked (I asked for the amount I spent on the yarn). It’sI next to impossible to get true value out of my projejcts, so I prefer to give them away or donate them to charity auctions. At least at auctions the price can be driven up a little and benefit charity.

    • June 26, 2013 at 10:54 am
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      Or we could make small ones and take them to the nursing homes in our areas. You can never get out what you put in.

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:42 am
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    I know from experience you can never get back what you put into your creations. I was upset at an auction recently when the Circle Square afghan I made only went to $7.50. But it went for a good cause. I get more of a reward when I make something and just donate it, they really appreciate the fact that they were thought of in a personal way. In our area we have a lot of basket parties so I just put a creation in a basket and donate it.

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:42 am
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    I agree with you so very much! I usually don’t even offer to crochet thing for people that don’t know how because they have no idea how much my time and talent is worth. They think if they buy the yarn they’re doing me a favor. I usually just reply, “you don’t want me to do it for you because you cannot afford ME”. I do always offer to teach them how to do it themselves .

  • June 26, 2013 at 10:39 am
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    No answers to your questions, just a comment that I agree with you 100%. I give my crocheted items as gifts or make items for my own satisfaction. I could never get enough to cover the cost of my time invested into each piece, and usually would barely cover the yarn, so I stopped trying to sell crochet and now I only crochet for the love of the craft.

    • June 26, 2013 at 10:53 am
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      I do understand…I just crochet for the ‘therapy’ and then give away my afghans. One can never get back what they put into their work.

    • June 26, 2013 at 11:18 am
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      I agree I don’t bother to sell anything as the true value to me is the gift I give and to make someone happy especially family and friends!!!!

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