Yarn Balls with Knots: Peeves & Helpful Tips

Mikey, The Crochet Crowd

Mikey, The Crochet Crowd

I am Michael Sellick, known online as ‘Mikey’, I am the founder and leader of The Crochet Crowd. I’m a ‘hooker’ at heart with the passion to crochet and play with yarn.

13 thoughts on “Yarn Balls with Knots: Peeves & Helpful Tips

  • November 11, 2014 at 9:57 am
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    I really enjoyed the tutorials. Very educational. Thank you for the hard work you put into makeing it. Warm regards Rochelle Hitchcock

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  • July 1, 2013 at 10:02 am
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    I have always had an issue with ugly knots in a yarn ball. I mean knots that are so big and bulky it is just obnoxious. I was making some summer skullies for my dad as a commission and I purchased Creme de la Creme cotton yarn and within that one tiny ball, there were three knots and some huge ugly ones too. I completely understand that breakage happens with cotton if you pull too hard but reattach the yarn with some grace!

    • July 14, 2013 at 11:36 pm
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      There is an easy way to continuously crochet with yarn that has knots, while leaving the knots out. I learned this technique on YouTube. This will only work with solid yarn or properly matched variegated yarn. Start by leaving a tail of yarn as you approach the knot. Then leave a tail following the knot. Continue crocheting. Then you can cut out the knot and weave in the two tails. I hope that’s clear. Happy hooking.

  • June 30, 2013 at 2:57 pm
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    I understand about there being a lot of waste if they didn’t knot it together but I feel that if the manufacturer wrote on the label a knot at approximately 20 yards it would make it less frustrating. Or maybe if they wrote how many knots in the skein. That solution would help the consumer and not as time consuming as my first suggestion. I have noticed that with some lots or a particular color there have been excess (3 or more knots) in a single skein. I will definitely take you up on the ball winding suggestion for projects with slow color change! Thank you for all the help.

  • June 30, 2013 at 2:02 pm
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    pre-winding the ball is such a great idea…thanks for sharing!

  • June 30, 2013 at 11:20 am
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    I recently bought 7 skeins of a certain brand of yarn and within 3 skeins of the same lot #, there were at least 40 knotted pieces. I rewind my yarn into balls first and noticed this. So frustrated at the amount of yarns per skein (regular size skeins, not jumbo) I wrote to the company and included pictures and explained this was the first time I had ever seen so many knots per skein. The company very quickly replied and I should be getting complimentary yarn in a few days. I wouldn’t have minded the knots so much, except for the fact that it was within the same lot and 3 of the skeins. I haven’t even wound the 4-7 balls yet. Who knows what I’ll find. I am very happy with the company who has since wrote me 4 times in 3 days to express their apologies although I didnt expect the complimentary yarn as a result of my email. I only sent it so their quality assurance group could pay closer attention in their manufacturing state. I will always trust that they are superior in customer service with the level of concern they showed me with my frustration. 🙂 I just usually cut the knot or two out and rematch up the yarn myself too.

    • July 1, 2013 at 10:05 am
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      That is so sad! I’m glad that they responded that quickly. I still have the pictures of mine, I should do the same as well. It’s not about the compensation but trying to improve the quality of the product.

  • June 30, 2013 at 9:23 am
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    How about doing a tutorial about the different techniques of joining yarns, but not actually making an actual knot.

  • June 30, 2013 at 9:08 am
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    Honestly, if it is a solid color I am working with, I just ignore the knot. They are usually small enough that no one notices, and on the rare occasion they do… Well, that is just one of the many charms of a handmade item. Though I would probably address them differently if I were selling my work.

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