How Yarn is Made

How Caron One Pound Yarn is Made

Mikey, The Crochet Crowd

Mikey, The Crochet Crowd

I am Michael Sellick, known online as ‘Mikey’, I am the founder and leader of The Crochet Crowd. I’m a ‘hooker’ at heart with the passion to crochet and play with yarn.

53 thoughts on “How Caron One Pound Yarn is Made

  • April 21, 2015 at 1:40 am
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    Thanks Mikey! Makes me feel a bit better. I did used to think they were seconds, unapproved for top quality sells. Hope that find a way to stop the break or label the skein so we anticipate and don’t have to pull out a nearly finished row to reconnect at the seam though. – Cornelia Wright / Cornelia’s Creative Corner

  • April 20, 2015 at 6:28 am
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    Loved the text-and-photos tour; too bad you didn’t have a video camera along. (As an attorney’s wife, totally understand the “no employee faces” rule you had to work under.)
    Hmmm . . . my “stash guardian” dog loves watching the “Dirty Jobs” show on Animal Planet . . . maybe I should suggest that Mike Rowe (the host of “Dirty Jobs”) should spend a day in a yarn factory sometime!

  • April 19, 2015 at 10:55 pm
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    That is awesome. I feel bad now. since I have complained about the knots.

  • April 19, 2015 at 3:11 pm
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    Thanks for writing and photographing this. It is a wonderful explanation of how it all works. Thanks for being such a genius at this.

  • April 19, 2015 at 1:26 pm
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    So cool to know. Now I won’t curse the knots as much, haha!

  • April 19, 2015 at 1:18 pm
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    Great article on a fantastic US yarn product. I would like to see some of the Caron Simply Soft colors being made… Wish I could visit their Tent Sale.

  • April 19, 2015 at 1:06 pm
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    Where can you find the reject yarns? Do they sell it just there or can you get it on line?

  • April 19, 2015 at 12:39 pm
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    Bang on Mikey!! Or SPOT ON as I say!! Loved seeing and reading about the process of it and would love to see more!!!
    So plz show us more!!!

  • April 19, 2015 at 11:46 am
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    This was very interesting, to bad people can’t tour the factory find this a great way to understand more about the product. You have shown the manufacturing of yarn real well. Can’t imagine the size of the warehouse, would be a knitter or crochetsers dream!

  • April 19, 2015 at 11:15 am
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    Thank you for sharing this article – I found it very interesting and enjoyable (perspective is always so enriching!) I would love to be able to tour a yarn production facility someday, until then, I will just have fun playing with the end product. 😉

  • April 19, 2015 at 10:36 am
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    Thank you for this. I love seeing how things are made. This was very interesting.

  • April 19, 2015 at 8:37 am
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    Loved this! Fascinating to see how the finished product is made, thanks for sharing.

  • October 5, 2014 at 1:02 pm
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    I loved finding out about how the yarn was produced and to see pictures too. It was great. That warehouse must be like heaven! Thank you!!!

  • October 3, 2014 at 2:07 pm
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    I really enjoyed the article. Good job! I have quite a yarn stash, but nothing to compare to the yarn warehouse. I like learning the steps of how the yarn got to that point.

  • October 3, 2014 at 12:07 pm
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    I loved this article. It’s like being in yarn heaven.

  • October 3, 2014 at 11:21 am
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    Omg! Mikey, what a wonderful, well written article. I felt like I was right there with you. The only thing missing was the noise and the smells. Thank you so much for sharing the experience.

  • October 2, 2014 at 8:23 pm
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    I love to learn new things. Had no idea yarn had such a lengthy journey before finding its way to my hooks and needles!

    And by the way….I’m Ivy’s grandma and we’re going to make sure she’s a yarnie!

  • October 2, 2014 at 6:06 am
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    That is SO cool! I was there the day you took the tour and was dying to see what the whole process was like…AMAZING! Thank You for sharing!!

  • October 2, 2014 at 12:56 am
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    This was awesome.You should suggest to them that a video walk through would be great.I mean not just for us adults but it would be quite informative for young children.Just like learn how crayons are made. ( Oh and by the way how the heck did you keep your calm in all that yarn being around you?)

  • October 2, 2014 at 12:36 am
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    Yes! A video would be fabulous. (I love to read and watch the video and watch the video and read. It’s what I do with books-on-tape, movies. I dive in and can’t seem to get enough of what I love/enjoy.) Yarn, watchout!

  • October 2, 2014 at 12:21 am
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    Very Cool, I have watched “How It’s Made” before and this is goes right along with it. I loved the pic’s and your explanations. It is so amazing on how fast and machine oriented it is. I adore the warehouse view and the winding. Thank you so much for sharing. 🙂

  • October 1, 2014 at 11:35 pm
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    How awesome. My mother was a fiber artist – hand weaver – and I can take wool from raw on the sheep to useable yarn. Don’t do it any longer but know how. So this was very cool to me.

    • April 19, 2015 at 9:02 pm
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      I would love to learn all of those processes.

  • October 1, 2014 at 11:29 pm
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    Thank you Mikey, that was great! Would love to see any more pictures you have. Yarn eutopia!!

  • October 1, 2014 at 10:59 pm
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    I very much enjoyed the behind the scenes look at yarn manufacturing. I particularly found the knots interesting. My grandmother, who was born in 1888 and married at the age of 18, worked in a mill before marrying. As a young girl, I remember her comments whenever she found a knot in the skein of yarn she was using. She wound note that that was a sign of poor quality, saying that ends should have been woven together. Thank you for bringing my grandmother back to me.

  • October 1, 2014 at 10:12 pm
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    Thank you, Dan and Mikey, for the wonderful inside look. I certainly didn’t know that much went into the packaging of yarn. I’ll look at my yarn skeins a little differently from now on!

  • October 1, 2014 at 9:31 pm
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    I loved seeing this! Thank you so much. I would love also to see the yarn winders.

  • October 1, 2014 at 9:05 pm
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    Very interesting! Any on video? That would be super cool!

  • October 1, 2014 at 8:51 pm
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    What a great tour! Definitely would love to see pictures of the hands free automated winder! I recently had the opportunity to tour a sock factory and made the statement that it would be cool to see how yarn was made! Thank you!

  • October 1, 2014 at 8:27 pm
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    more! this was very interesting…

  • October 1, 2014 at 8:22 pm
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    I enjoyed the tour very much. Thank you Mikey. I would enjoy seeing any photos you have of automated hands free ball winders.

  • October 1, 2014 at 8:13 pm
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    This was amazing..so glad they allowed you to share would love to see more pictures.

  • October 1, 2014 at 8:05 pm
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    How fascinating! Enjoyed it…and yes, it would be interesting to see the other one. Thank you for sharing this with us!

  • October 1, 2014 at 7:41 pm
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    Yes I liked this article, details, pictures, explanation mills ends etc….thanks very much!

  • October 1, 2014 at 7:36 pm
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    Wow, that’s really interesting. Thank you for sharing. I love knowing how things are made.

  • October 1, 2014 at 7:23 pm
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    Interesting! And well written too! I was surprised at the explanation of mill ends, though. I have bought some brands’ ends and they really did appear to be of a lower quality. Thanks!

  • October 1, 2014 at 7:22 pm
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    thank you for sharing that with us Mikey and yes!!! we would love to see your picks of the automated winders… your tour was quite interesting!!

  • October 1, 2014 at 7:07 pm
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    That was very interesting

  • October 1, 2014 at 6:56 pm
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    Thank you so much for sharing your Caron factory yarn tour. It’s fascinating to learn how it becomes the product with which we ‘play’. Anything else you’d like to share, I for one, would certainly love to see

  • October 1, 2014 at 6:48 pm
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    Glad you got to see the process. Thanks for sharing it.

  • October 1, 2014 at 6:45 pm
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    Loved the article and pictures
    Would enjoy seeing more.

  • October 1, 2014 at 6:44 pm
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    Educational,Thank you Mikey.We learn something new every day.

  • October 1, 2014 at 6:40 pm
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    WOW. I have never seen it made before. I think the process of puffing it back up is most interesting. We were at the tent sale and i had no idea so much was going on behind those walls 🙂 Thank you so much for sharing.. One thing I would love to see is how they make the ombre colors. Maybe next year Mikey?? 🙂 Love Caron. Its my favorite

  • October 1, 2014 at 6:29 pm
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    would love to see any pictures you have of the process. Very interesting! Would love to see the handsfree automatic winders.

  • October 1, 2014 at 6:27 pm
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    Very interesting to see the process of yarn making in a large factory. You had posted y’all were going to have a tour and we’re glad they allowed you to take photos. Bang on! 🙂

  • October 1, 2014 at 6:25 pm
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    I really enjoyed this article. Thanks for taking the time to put it together for us.

  • October 1, 2014 at 6:24 pm
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    Very interesting. Thank you Mikey.

  • October 1, 2014 at 6:23 pm
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    This is great! I’m always fascinated to see how things are produced. It makes me want to live in the warehouse.

Comments are closed.