Crochet Abbreviations List
Crochet Abbreviations List
Crochet Abbreviations List

Crochet Abbreviations

Crochet abbreviations are used in patterns. If you are new to crochet, it may take you a bit to get used to seeing short form abbreviations in the instructions. This is done so that patterns don’t have to be mini novels. It can simplify instructions. The list is general and typically if a designer has used something unusual, they generally make a note and explain the abbreviation.

Crochet abbreviations and terminology has become standard thanks to the Yarn Craft Council of America. It is council where yarn companies and designers come together to create standards where yarn users, like you and I, can count on being the same. If you look at yarn ball labels in the major retailers, you will notice the terminology, symbols and more are similar between all major yarn manufacturers.

Not everyone follows this standard, there are some new designers that are unaware of standards that are in place and may make up their own abbreviations. Usually these type of patterns are self published. Following a standard makes it easier for everyone.

The terms are in North American Standards.

Download the Abbreviations List Here

Abbreviations List Downloadable PDF
Abbreviations List Downloadable PDF. Click the picture to download, save or print.

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15 thoughts on “Crochet Abbreviations List Guide

  1. Have a pattern for a shawl that says โ€œcornerโ€, but no instructions on how to do that. Itโ€™s the point of the shawl. HELP please.

  2. I have been writing my own crochet patterns and have followed all of the abbreviations, but I have many of the abbreviations in caps, such as SC and DC. Should I go back and change my patterns to have them lower case, as you have listed? Does this make them incorrect for the standard or is it interchangeable? Thanks!

    • No really. I don’t think that is a deal breaker. I have done that too. Usually when a sentence starts like “Dc in the first stitch.” the first letter is capitalized because it’s the first letter of the sentence. I think you are fine.

  3. Even though I have been crocheting for 48 years, I always like to refer back to the stitch glossary to make sure that I am reading the right ones. ๐Ÿ™‚

  4. Thank you this is interesting, but may I ask if this is US or British stitiches? As know to my cost, the terms used by the US are different to those us by the UK

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