Study of Transition and Texture
Study of Transition & Texture
Study of Transition & Texture

Crochet Study of Transition & Texture Afghan

The Crochet Study of Transition & Texture Afghan is a simpler textured based project. As an educator, sometimes I just want to crochet for myself without the pressure. So I looked at the Red Heart Colorscape and thought to myself, what can I do with this yarn and satisfy with my need to crochet without a lot of thought after I have learned the design and just hook and be happy in my own free time.

Get-Crochet-Crowd-Pattern-PDF
Free Pattern: Study of Transition Blanket

Originally, I was just going to do criss-cross stitch for the entire afghan but I thought to myself, I’m more creative than that. So I thought to myself, after using 3 balls, what if I add a secondary colour and a different stitch pattern for that specific colour. Thus, I recalled the zig-zag basketweave from my childhood. I thought it’s an easy stitch to follow to satisfy my need to keep myself busy without pressure. So I figured, I would use 3 balls just for the new stitch and then switch back.

Essentially, I ran out of yarn for this project and placed an order on Yarnspirations.com so I could finish.

The afghan is in 5 visual sections. 3 of the sections are using Red Heart Colorscape Barcelonia and the other 2 are using Shanghai.

More Ideas

  1. Crochet Planet Earth Crochet Along
  2. Crochet Festive Texture Afghan + Tutorial
  3. Corner to Corner Afghan + Video Tutorial
  4. Crochet Neutral Afghan Pattern + Tutorial
  5. 6 Halloween Ideas + Amazing Crochet Top Hat

Tip

  • Multiples for this project are 4 + 1.
  • I would encourage you to move from ball to ball within the same colour to match. You don’t need to waste yarn. Insert it into the project where the colouring is close to the same.
  • Each section is made up of just using 3 balls fully. So there are no number of rows given. Use up what you have to prevent wasting of yarn.

Tutorials

26 thoughts on “Crochet Study of Transitions Blanket Pattern

  1. Hello I have watched your tutorials for sometime I’m a beginner
    and I’m trying to challenge myself and I find your videos very engaging I was just curious if I could make the whole afghan with the cross stitch and not use the other stitch. Thank you for your help

    • The great thing about an afghan is that you can make them out of pretty much any stitch you desire. If you used just one stitch, by the time you are done you have that stitch down pat. However, if you are unsure about it, I would suggest doing a dishcloth first, then you would have a good idea of how it would look.

  2. What a stunning afghan! At 2:37 you show two alternative colours. They are beautiful. What are the names of those two colours? Thank you.

  3. Hi Mikey….I’m having trouble. I’ve been doing the cross stitch and each row has 86 as in the instructions, but I end up the single stitch row with 173 stitches! If I end with 1 less stitch, the row looks too short and the cross stitches on the next row are “off”. What am I doing wrong??? Maggie

    • I would just add an extra stitch. I cannot tell from my seat here what you are doing wrong to advise. I would just add in the stitch to get back on track.

      • Thank you. I can’t decide if I’m counting incorrectly or not. I guess I’ll find out when I get to the next panel ?.

  4. I got 85 X stitches instead of the 86 in the written pattern. 85×2=170 plus one stitch end & beginning of row=172 stitches

  5. I am not understanding what Mikey means…..
    “I would encourage you to move from ball to ball within the same colour to match. You don’t need to waste yarn. Insert it into the project where the colouring is close to the same.”

    Does it mean when finishing up one ball, do I use/start the new ball exactly the same color where the other ball ended, or make each row the same color and use yarn from another ball to finish that row?

    TIA

    • If a ball is ending with pink. Ensure the next ball is starting in the same pink tone. if the ball isn’t ready, just pull out the centre of the ball until you see that same shade and then start. It will keep the colouring looking consistent.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *