Crochet Stepping Textures Chevron Afghan Pattern

Stepping Textures Chevron Afghan by Jeanne Steinhilber
Stepping Textures Chevron Afghan by Jeanne Steinhilber
Stepping Textures Chevron Afghan by Jeanne Steinhilber

The crochet Stepping Textures Chevron Afghan is a blanket that is thick and squishy, perfect to snuggle under as fall comes around.

I made this one as a gift for a sports lover.  I think she will enjoy it as she goes off to watch fall sports, football and soccer.  Use your favorite team colors for the sports lover in your life.

Thank you to Cathy Lund and Wendy Marple for testing this pattern for me.

When you upload your project to The Crochet Crowd Stitch Social Group or Instagram, feel free to tag me so I can see what you have crocheted.  Follow me on Instagram @ jeannestein or on Facebook.  My designs can also be saved in your Ravelry favorites by following me HERE.

Get-Crochet-Crowd-Pattern-PDF
Free Pattern: Stepping Textures Chevron Afghan

Crochet Diagram

You can save or print the crochet diagram to assist you.

Crochet Stepping Texture Afghan Diagram
Crochet Stepping Texture Afghan Diagram. Use this one if you are not planning on printing the pattern. The diagram is turned landscape as you see it for your convenience.

Tutorial

Stepping Textures Chevron Afghan by Jeanne Steinhilber
Stepping Textures Chevron Afghan by Jeanne Steinhilber

Stepping Textures Chevron Afghan

Designed by Jeanne Steinhilber

Red Heart® With Love™ (198 g/7 oz, 338 meters/370 yards)

  • Color A – Peacock 4 balls
  • Color B – White 2 ball

Size U.S. J/10 (6.0 mm) crochet hook.

Measurements Approx 45” x 54” [114 x 137 cm]. 

Multiples 27 + 29

Abbreviations List 

  • Ch(s) = Chain(s)
  • Dc = Double crochet
  • Rep = Repeat
  • Rs = Right side
  • Sc = Single crochet
  • St(s) = Stitch(es)

Special Stitches

Bobble = Double crochet 3 together in same stitch. This is worked on the wrong side.

Instructions

1st row: With A, ch 164, in 2nd ch from hook, 2 sc, 1 sc in next 12 chs, *sk 2 chs, 1 sc in next 12 chs, 3 sc in next ch, 1 sc in next 12 chs; rep from * 4 more times, sk 2 chs, 1 sc in next 12 chs, 2 sc in last ch. Turn. 163 sc.

2nd row: (RS) Ch 3, (counts as dc here and throughout), 1 dc in same st, 1 dc in next 12 sts, *sk 2 sts, 1 dc in next 12 sts, 3 dc in next st, 1 dc in next 12 sts; rep from * 4 more times, sk 2 sts, 1 dc in next 12 sts, 2 dc in last st. Turn. 163 dc.

3rd row: Ch 1, 2 sc in first st, [1 sc next st, 1 bobble in next st, 1 sc in next st] 4 times, *sk 2 sts, [1 sc in next st, 1 bobble in next st, 1 sc in next st] 4 times, 3 sc in next st, [1 sc in next st, 1 bobble in next st, 1 sc in next st] 4 times; rep from * 4 more times, sk next 2 sts, [1 sc in next st, 1 bobble in next st, 1 sc in next st] 4 times, 2 sc in last st. Turn. 48 bobbles, 115 sc.

4th – 13th rows: Rep rows 2 and 3.

14th row: Rep row 2. Break A, attach B. Turn. 163 dc.

15th row: Ch 1, 2 sc in first st, [1 dc in next st, 1 sc in next st] 6 times, *sk 2 sts, [1 sc in next st, 1 dc in next st] 6 times, (1 sc, 1 dc, 1 sc) in next st, [1 dc in next st, 1 sc in next st] 6 times; rep from * 4 more times, sk 2 sts, [1 sc in next st, 1 dc in next st] 6 times, (1 sc, 1 dc) in last st. Turn. 163 sts.

16th – 21st rows: Rep row 15. Break B, attach A. Turn.

22nd – 23rd rows: Rep rows 2 and 3.

24th row: Rep row 2. Break A, attach B. Turn.

25th – 29th rows: Rep row 15. Break B, attach A. Turn.

Repeat rows 2 – 29, twice, then 2 – 14 once more. Finish off.

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Stepping Textures Chevron Afghan by Jeanne Steinhilber
Stepping Textures Chevron Afghan by Jeanne Steinhilber
Stepping Textures Chevron Afghan by Jeanne Steinhilber
Stepping Textures Chevron Afghan by Jeanne Steinhilber

Designs by Jeanne

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20 Comments

  1. Barbara

    Greetings again! I just did another swatch of this blanket. When you refer to the “second” chain from the hook, you are COUNTING the loop on the hook. In every pattern I have ever worked on, you do NOT count the loop that is on the hook in the chain row. What your pattern “should say” is that you are starting 2 single crochets in the FIRST chain from the hook. I know I am not crazy! I just did the first three rows of the pattern, starting w/2 sc in the first chain in the row. That is the only way it works. Again, I have been crocheting for years, do swatches and count every stitch. Your pattern requires you to count the first loop on the hook. Therefore, the pattern should read 2 sc in the FIRST chain from the hook. Thank you and have a nice day.

  2. Barbara

    Greetings, I am 50 years old, crocheting for 25. My post is not a complaint, but rather a concern. I am not the only one that has mentioned this problem…as I do follow other crochet forums. I watched Mike’s video several times and for the life of me, when you get to the last stitch in the first row, I still do not see a way to add the extra stitches. If you watch the video he DOES go into the loop that is the slip knot! At the end of the first row, you add 2 sc in the last stitch. The last stitch is not the 12th stitch, but rather the 13th! Where are you getting that extra stitch if you are not going in that loop? The pattern does not say add do 2 extra sc in the 12th stitch in the first row. I would love to make a video of me doing the chain and the first row. I am very experienced in crocheting and love your patterns. I would love to show you what happens when you do not go in that loop!
    Thank you for your time. I am not crazy. I have made several of your blankets that have come out beautifully.

    • Jeanne

      ” The last stitch is not the 12th stitch, but rather the 13th! ”
      That is a true statement.
      I’m adding a screenshot from the video. The yellow points to the slip knot and the red points to the very last chain.
      last chain stitch

      So this statement ” If you watch the video he DOES go into the loop that is the slip knot!” is not true as he is working into a chain stitch.

      • Barbara

        The adjust YOUR pattern to indicate 1st chain from the hook. The way I was taught to crochet many moons ago is that you do NOT count the loop that is ON THE HOOK…you count away from that loop. The only way your pattern works is if you do 2 sc in the first chain from the hook! Thank you!

      • Thank you Barbara. We have reviewed the pattern. We will take your advice under advisement. We respectfully agree to disagree here. I will leave up your comments here for anyone that is doing it your way as you may be helpful for them. Love crochet as we each have our own paths to follow.

        Thank you again and please enjoy your day.

  3. Barbara

    Mike, Thank you for your tutorial. As a teacher myself, I can see that you have a true knack for understanding how people learn, and are great with clear explanation.
    One thing, please inform your listeners that the SLIP Knot is counted as an actual stitch when starting this project. The SLIP KNOT is where you put the extra stitches (after the multiples of 12). I realized this after working this blanket, and noticed the same thing in doing 4 “Hugs and Kisses” blankets. I have seen people comment that they cannot “get the count right”. That is the reason why. Thank you for doing such a great job! I enjoy your tutorials!

    • Jeanne

      I have never counted a slip knot in use in any of my patterns.

      • Barbara

        Greetings, I have never experienced either and I have been crocheting over 25 years. Yet in your patterns, it’s an absolute must or the count will be off. I double checked my counts and stitches in my swatches before working on a project. At first, I thought it was me. I watch Mike’s video very carefully as well. The only way you would NOT have to count the slip knot as a stitch is if you do a sc crochet in the first chain from the hook. (Even then, the count is off on the other side). The slip knot is the last stitch that needs to be worked in the 1st row, or the pattern will not turn out correctly–to add the last two stitches. I have sat with people to show them WHY their count is off. Hence the reason why.
        I love the patterns you create. Just trying to make a helpful suggestion—as I have encountered the same thing with this patter and the Hugs and Kisses pattern. Thank you.

      • Jeanne

        I have been crocheting for 50 years, and have never stitched into the beginning slip knot, ever. I would love to sit down with you and crochet together and compare what your difference is. Maybe one day, who knows. But since the Hugs and Kisses has been made by thousands of people and this is the first I’m hearing of the problem, I don’t think I need to change anything on my part. Have a wonderful day. 🙂

    • That’s interesting. Let me talk to Jeanne. That shouldn’t be the case. Thank you for bringing this to my attention. I never count that slip knot as a stitch as it disappears as soon as you pull it tight. Either way, let me talk to Jeanne. I don’t think she intended that.

  4. Jennifer

    I love the look of this blanket, I’m going to attempt it and have bought orange and white – inspiration being the campervan my hubby and I have just bought, bright orange on the bottom and white on top. Thank you for the pattern.

  5. Teodora Dimitrova

    This pattern is a life – saver. I have been trying to find a pattern that will scream at me, grab me and be fun to crochet. I bought red, green and white yarn and I have waited for the inspiration to struck. No such luck though. Not until I watched Mikey’s video of Jeanne’s Stepping Textures Chevron Afghan. Now I only have to mix the colors as I go but the design is WOW. So is Mikey’s video as usual. Thank you for being my inspiration.

  6. Nan Sal

    Beutiful! I would like to make this but would would also like to make it larger and longer overall… what count would I need going across the first time please? Also, how would they break down? For example, chain multiples of 11 add 3 at the end, etc… I am newer to this and need the help if you can off it! Thank you!

    • The pattern has the multiple of 27 + 29. So chain in sets of 27. When you are happy with the length of the chain, add the final 29 chains for the balance.

  7. Leslie

    Good to know. The only time I used the bobble extensively was for a dishcloth. It was shown with bobbles in every row. But if I am understanding you correctly it would have really been every other row–so bobbles on both front and back. I did push them all to one side but that seemed a real waste of my time considering I’d need to continually do it.

    • I’m not sure, this pattern is for a blanket, so without reading the pattern you are referring to, I can’t honestly answer. not all patterns are the same, so dishcloths would possibly be written doing them every row to give you texture on both sides opposed to just one side.

  8. Leslie

    Lovely. Question/comment: when I make bobbles they often “pop” onto the wrong side. How do I correct that? I’d love to make this but my bobbles look beautiful but don’t stay where I put them!

    • If you noticed, the pattern stated to do the bobble on Row 3. That’s the wrong side of the blanket. They naturally fall to the opposite side of the work. So if you do that stitch on the front side, it will pop out at the back. The way Jeanne has written this, if you do this on the back, it pops out to the front. There’s no way to fix that without crocheting bobbles onto the back side. Some designers tell you to force it to the front with your finger but it rarely ever stays.

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