Crochet Beginning Chain Counts & Worksheet

Crochet Beginning Chain Counts & Worksheet

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Beginning Chain Counts

Beginning Chain Counts

Average Stitches Across

My Beginning Chain Worksheet illustrates. This worksheet assumes straight rows back and forth. At the bottom of the article is the worksheet for chevrons (waves) for changing sizes too.

People ask, a lot, on how many chains to start with. We have done the research to determine the average chains that start typical sizes. I have also given you the power to put in your set desired size to calculate that as well.

I have also done a brief explanation of how to figure out the chain counts if there are multiples involved. Jeanne also has a trick of doing chains across and then in the first pass, figure out the multiple and then undo the unused chains.

 

Get-Crochet-Crowd-Pattern-PDF

View / Download Worksheet

Worksheet Details Below Shown in Download

May 10, 2020

The Crochet Crowd – Researched by Mikey

Blanket Sizing Guidelines

  • Receiving Blanket – Usually Square starting at 24″ to 36″
  • Small Cradle – 15″ x 30″
  • Large Cradle – 18″ x 33″
  • Baby Blankets Typically Range – Minimum 24″ – 30″ width
  • Toddler Afghans – Minimum Range from 30″ – 36″ width
  • Young Child – Minimum Range from 42″ – 48″ width
  • Teenagers – Minimum 48″ – 60″ width

Other Afghans For Decor

  • Throw Afghans – 60″ width – 48″ to 60″ length
  • Lapghan – 36″ width – 48″ to accommodate a wheelchair or regular sitting positions on chairs.

Mattress Top Sizes without Drape

  • Small Cradle – 15″ x 30″
  • Large Cradle – 18″ x 33″
  • Crib Blanket – 28″ x 52″
  • Twin – 39″ x 75″
  • Full / Double – 54″ x 75″
  • Queen – 60″ x 80″
  • King – 76″ x 80″
  • California King – 72″ x 84″

Mattress Sizes with Drape Over Sides

  • Crib – 36″ x 54″
  • Twin – 69″ x 90″
  • Full / Double – 84″ x 90″
  • Queen – 90″ x 95″
  • King – 106″ x 95″
  • California King – 102″ x 99″

The goal of this document is to give you the estimated stitches across for the sizing the yarn. For the length of the project, that creativity is left in your hands but the average sizes are on the last page. I looked at general sizes on existing patterns for Yarnspirations.com to determine what the designers have suggested. I also have my own experience in this area with self-designing samples too. Turning chain has not been factored into the 

Average Stitches Across for #3 Weight Yarn

This category would be examples like baby-weight yarns. US G / 4 mm hook assumed. 

Math Assumptions: 91 sts / 19.5” = 4.6 sts / inch. 

  • 24” Receiving Blanket = 111 sts
  • 36” Baby Blanket = 165 sts
  • 39” Twin Size = 179 sts
  • 42” Young Child Blanket = 193 sts
  • 54” Full / Double / Throw = 248 sts
  • 60” Queen = 276 sts
  • 76” King = 350 sts

Desired Inches _________ x 4.6 sts = ______________ sts across.

Average Stitches Across for #4 Weight Yarn

This category would be examples like Red Heart Super Saver, Caron One Pound and many others. US I / 5.5 mm hook assumed. 

Math Assumptions: 157 sts / 52” = 3 sts / inch. 

  • 24” Receiving Blanket = 72 sts
  • 36” Baby Blanket = 108 sts
  • 39” Twin Size = 117 sts
  • 42” Young Child Blanket = 126 sts
  • 54” Full / Double / Throw = 162 sts
  • 60” Queen = 180 sts
  • 76” King = 228 sts

Desired Inches _________ x 3 sts = ______________ sts across.

Average Stitches Across for #5 Weight Yarn

This category would be examples like Bernat Maker Home Dec or Red Heart Soft Essentials and many others. US L / 8 mm Hook assumed. 

Math Assumptions for L / 8 mm hook: 95 sts / 42” = 2.3 sts / inch. 

  • 24” Receiving Blanket = 55 sts
  • 36” Baby Blanket = 83 sts
  • 39” Twin Size = 90 sts
  • 42” Young Child Blanket = 97 sts
  • 54” Full / Double / Throw = 124 sts
  • 60” Queen = 138 sts
  • 76” King = 175 sts

Desired Inches _________ x 2.3 sts = ______________ sts across.

Average Stitches Across for #6 Weight Yarn

This category would be examples like Bernat Blanket and many others. US N / 10 mm hook assumed. 

Math Assumptions for N / 10 mm hook: 80 sts / 48” = 1.7 sts / inch. 

  • 24” Receiving Blanket = 41 sts
  • 36” Baby Blanket = 61 sts
  • 39” Twin Size = 66 sts
  • 42” Young Child Blanket = 71 sts
  • 54” Full / Double / Throw = 92 sts
  • 60” Queen = 102 sts
  • 76” King = 129 sts

Desired Inches _________ x 1.7 sts = ______________ sts across.

Average Stitches Across for #7 Weight Yarn

This category would be examples like Bernat Mega Bulky. This partcular category can range to really tube-like thick yarn. It’s the highest level, as of 2020, assigned to a yarn ball but can be variety of thicknesses beyond #6. Assumed is a S / 19 mm hook.

Math Assumptions for S / 19 mm hook: 58 sts / 48” = 1.2 sts / inch. 

  • 24” Receiving Blanket = 28 sts
  • 36” Baby Blanket = 43 sts
  • 39” Twin Size = 47 sts
  • 42” Young Child Blanket = 50 sts
  • 54” Full / Double / Throw = 65 sts
  • 60” Queen = 72 sts
  • 76” King = 91 sts

Desired Inches _________ x 1.7 sts = ______________ sts across.

Beginning Chain(s)

The stitches across do not include extra chain(s). For basic afghans, you need to add an extra chain(s) at the end to get the right stitch number across. 

Examples:

  • For single crochet across the chain. + 1 chain so you can single crochet 2nd chain from hook to maintain the correct stitch count.
  • For half double crochet across the chain. + 2 chains so you can hdc in 3rd chain from hook. 
  • For double crochet across the chain. + 3 chains so you can dc in 4th chain from hook. 

Some designers change the standard counts from this for their own purposes. Refer to their designs for clarification.

Beginning Chain(s) for Multiples

For multiples where a set number of stitches needs to be set to match the pattern exactly.

For basic afghans, you need to add an extra chain(s) at the end to get the right stitch number across. For example, the Baby Waffle Stitch blanket is multiples of 4 + 1

This means, you will chain in sets of 4 and at the end of the chain, you will add one extra chain to keep the balance. This means you have to be exact with your chain counts going across. 

Assumptions

  • Using #4 Weight Yarn: 157 sts / 52” = 3 sts / inch. 
  • 24” Receiving Blanket = 72 sts is recommended but we have to figure out the exact chain count. 
  • 72 sts recommended / 4 (multiples) = 18 sets of 4. 
  • 18 sets x 4 multiples = 72 ch. Add 1 extra chain. = 72 chains to start.

What if the multiple was 5 + 3 instead. 

  • 72 sts recommended / 5 (multiples) = 14.4 sets of 5 but there is something after the decimal. Remove the decimal for the next calculation. 
  • 14 sets x 5 multiples = 70 ch. Add 3 extra chain. = 73 chains to start

Tricks Designers Do

See download for graphic images referenced in this section.

Designers and self-creators sometimes just chain a wide enough chain to suit their desires. If the multiple is figured out on the passing across the chain, they will do their multiples and any chains left over, they will just undo the starting strand to make it appear they figured it out in advance. 

Final Word

Changing a multiple of a design doesn’t make the design a brand new pattern. The original designer (independent crafter) has already done the mathematics and explored the stitches for the combination. 

Example in the diagram above with the crisscrossing. That is for a baby size blanket. Changing the chain counts to a bigger number to make for a throw size isn’t a brand new pattern if you are not the original designer. So if you wanted this baby blanket, based on the pattern diagram, I can tell the multiple is 6 + 2. I can just keep doing my chains in sets of 6 until I get to the desired width and then add 2 chains at the end. 

I’m just increasing the stitch multiples, not creating a new design. 

More Ideas

  1. Caron Cotton Cakes Big Format
  2. Crochet Tasseled Pillow Pattern
  3. Crochet Rainbow Wave Blanket
  4. Crochet Caron Cakes Slouchy Hat
  5. Crochet Mum and Me Shawl
Chevron Downloadable Sheets

Chevron Downloadable Sheets

Crochet Chevron Afghan Downloadable Afghan Sizes

Chevron afghans can be hard to calculate the multiples and adjust to sizing. I have figured out the math for you to download.

Sheet 1 is the Single Crochet Version. It matches the Crochet Baby Zig Zag Chevron Blanket. You can download the free sheet by clicking the picture and/or Download Single Crochet Sheet Here.

Single Crochet Downloadable Sheet

I have listed the assumptions for this sizing that is shown.

Chevron Afghan Using Single Crochet Stitches

Chevron Afghan Using Single Crochet Stitches

Tutorial that matches this Single Crochet Sizing

Keep in mind that the blanket is using back loops. You can opt not to use those loops and the width won’t change.

Double Crochet Downloadable Sheet

Using a typical chevron blanket called the Crochet Breeze Blanket as standard. The assumptions for hook size and yarn weight are provided. You can click the picture to download and/or Click Here to Get Free Downloadable.

Chevron Afghan Starting Chain Sizes - Double Crochet

Chevron Afghan Starting Chain Sizes – Double Crochet

Tutorial that matches the Double Crochet Sizing

Keep in mind that the blanket is using back loops. You can opt not to use those loops and the width won’t change.

More Ideas

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  2. Crochet Bavarian Square + Tutorial
  3. 11 Crochet Senior Project Ideas
  4. Crochet Sky Watch Blanket + Worksheet
  5. 5 Star Beanie Crochet Hat + Tutorial

More Blanket Patterns

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Mikey, aka Michael Sellick, of The Crochet Crowd, started this online journey back in 2008. A mere hobby in trying to reach out to others as he was mentally struggling with his own issues. His goal was simple, find others in the yarn communities, like him, that have a common interest.

The journey and main baby of the whole idea started with a YouTube Channel and then in 2011, an official website was developed. Michael is not only the face of The Crochet Crowd but also the working engine behind the crowd in self-taught programming, social media and so much more.

Enjoy the stitching journey. Life is short, enjoy this wonderful hobby and all of the learning opportunities that come with it.